Italian Cinema under Fascism

Roberto Rossellini – L’uomo dalla croce aka Man with a Cross (1943)

An extremely rare film by Roberto Rossellini, his third feature, made under the Fascist control of Italy. Basically rejected after the War because of the Fascist content of the film, “Rossellini produces a work which focuses upon the Italian expeditionary forces on the Eastern Front and upon a Catholic chaplain representative of Italy’s religious majority…the principal character’s humanity and sacrifice seem to prefigure the good-natured priest of Rome, Open City who works with leftist Resistance leaders…Rossellini underlines the common humanity in Fascist and Bolshevik alike” (Peter Bonadella, Italian Cinema from Neo-Realism to Present). Read More »

Nunzio Malasomma & Mario Bonnard – Non ti conosco più AKA I Don’t Know You Anymore (1936)

Non ti conosco più (I don’t know you anymore) is a 1936 film directed by Nunzio Malasomma based on a theatrical text by Aldo De Benedetti, who also worked on the script.
Quote:
Luisa is the shrewish wife of the attorney Paolo Malpieri who can’t stand the avarice of her husband who refuses to satisfy her whims: a new car, an electric water heater and new furniture. Read More »

Ákos Ráthonyi – La fortuna viene dal cielo (1942)

Engaged by an old lawyer, the young woman Anna receives in present of which it is quite soon relieved a jewel.
Feeling itself braccato, the pickpocket is forced to leave the precious one found by a hungry singer and recognised like gift of the provision.
The unfortunate event will take Anna away from the Prince of the Court, finding consolation between Andrew’s arms, which in the meantime it has entered into possession of the necklace… Read More »

Amleto Palermi – L’allegro fantasma AKA The Happy Ghost (1941)

The nobleman Pantaleo of Santa Paola has deceased recently, but in the preamble to his will is read his confession in which he declares to have had, in his youth, an affair with a circus horsewoman from which were born two twin sons.
The search for these twins will bring the notary Pensabene and their cousins heirs, Rosa, Lilli e Titti, to fortuitously find Nicolino, the first of the twins. The search will continue with other hilarious adventures that will see the figure of Toto alternating with several phantasmagorical characters, surrounded by a family that wants to undermine their safety in order to collect the money of Pantaleo’s inheritance. Read More »

Mario Soldati & Carlo Borghesio – Due milioni per un sorriso (1939)

PLOT:
Giacomo Perotti, who made his fortune in America, returns to Italy rich and wealthy. He wants, above all else, to find the woman who in his youth one day smiled at him, making him fall in love.
This nostalgic and utopian dream is the chance for a shady entrepreneur to persuade him to finance a film in memory of the episode of his distant youth.
Perotti accidentally meets a young professor who strangely resembles a lot to him when he was young and puts him in charge of the artistic direction of the film. During the casting for the leading actress, the young professor meets a typist, falls in love with her, and would like to make her the star of the film.
But the shady producer has in mind another actress… Read More »

Goffredo Alessandrini – Noi vivi aka We the Living (1942)

The time is the Russian Revolution. The place is a country burdened with fear – the midnight knock at the door, the bread hidden against famine, the haunted eyes of the fleeing, the grublike fat of the appeasers and oppressors. In a bitter struggle of the individual against the collective, three people stand forth with the mark of the unconquered in their bearing: Kira, who wants to be a builder, and the two men who love her – Leo, an aristocrat, and Andrei, a Communist. In their tensely dramatic story, Ayn Rand shows what the theories of Communism mean in practice. We the Living is not a story of politics but of the men and women who have to struggle for existence behind the Red banners and slogans. Read More »

Vittorio De Sica – La porta del cielo (1945)

SYNOPSIS
During War World II, Vittorio De Sica was approached by Goebbels to help relaunch the Italian film industry under the auspices of Musolini’s puppet regime. In order to escape collaboration with the Nazis, De Sica quickly invented the project “La porta del cielo” a film about religious miracles funded by the Vatican. Appalled by their plight during the German occupation of Rome, De Sica cast many Jews in the film to spare them from Nazi persecution, extending the shoot until the American allies arrived in the capital. Read More »