Jean-Luc Godard and Anne-Marie Miéville

Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville – Soft and Hard (1986)

Jonathan Rosenbaum in the Chicago Reader wrote:
Soft and Hard (A Soft Conversation Between Two Friends on a Hard Subject)
Soft and Hard, a highly intimate 48-minute video made by Godard and Anne-Marie Mieville for English television three years later, shows Godard and Mieville at their home in rural Switzerland. In many ways the most intimate and domestic of Godard’s works, it broaches the matter of what distinguishes film from video. Can be viewed in retrospect as necessary preludes to his recently completed magnum opus, the eight-part Histoire(s) du cinema. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville – L’Enfance de l’Art (1993)

A woman, a child, a man and another child, the noise of bombs falling and of planes passing by, in a urban landscape destroyed by war.
A man dies before he had time to write on the back of La liberté guidant le peuple de Delacroix: that could be the plot, just the enigma consisting of a missing word. A question opened before death, resolved by a child, the shadow and spirit of Gavroche. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville – De l’origine du XXIe siècle & The Old Place & Libérte et Patrie & Je vous salue, Sarajevo (1993 – 2002) (DVD)

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4 Short films by Jean-Luc Godard and Anne-Marie Miéville.
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Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville – France/tour/detour/deux/enfants (1977)

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Quote:
General description
In this astonishing twelve-part project for and about television — the title of which refers to a 19th-century French primer Le tour de la France par deux enfants — Godard and Mieville take a detour through the everyday lives of two children in contemporary France.

This complex, intimately scaled study of the effect of television on the French family is constructed around Godard’s interviews with a school girl and school boy, Camille and Arnaud. Godard’s provocative questions to the children range from the philosophical (Do you think you have an existence?) to the social (What does revolution mean to you?). The programs’ symmetrical structure alternates between Camille’s and Arnaud’s segments (or movements), each of which is labelled with on-screen titles: Obscur/Chimie is paired with Lumiere/Physique; Realitie/Logique with Reve/Morale; Violence/Grammaire with Desordre/Calcul. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville – Le rapport Darty (1989)

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“French companies never seemed to learn that Godard would never make anything like a traditional advertisement, so when the Darty appliance chain commissioned a pub from the mischievous director, they were in for trouble: a daring deconstruction of consumerism, rejected by its funders.” Read More »