Jean-Luc Godard – Pravda (1969)

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Quote:
English dubbed – Jean-Luc Godard (Dziga Vertov Group) film

Pravda was filmed clandestinely in Czechoslovakia on 16mm. It’s one of those films Godard made with the Groupe Dziga Vertov – a Marxist film about the political situation after the ’68 revolution. I’d call it a kind of essay. Basically, we get an hour’s worth of montage of very interesting documentary images with voice-over.

It’s been compared to ‘Letter to Jane’ and that’s probably a good comparison.

Godard apparently described Pravda in retrospect as ‘a marxist-leninist garbage movie’. Continue reading

Jean-Luc Godard – Sauve qui peut (la vie) AKA Every Man For Himself (1980)

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Quote:
During the 1970’s Jean Luc Godard abandoned the notion of making normal commercial films for cinematic distribution in favour of his Marxist-Leninist ‘Dziga Vertov’ propaganda films. The director returned to regular filmmaking in 1980 with Sauve Qui Peut (La Vie), his first theatrical release since his furious outburst against modern bourgeois society in 1967 with Weekend. Delivering another hate-filled attack on almost every aspect of modern society, it’s like he had never been away. Continue reading

Jean-Luc Godard – Vrai faux passeport (2006)

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Vrai faux passeport was produced by Godard as part of the Pompidou Center retrospective and the Voyages en Utopie exhibition held in Paris in 2006.

The film opened the film retrospective -one of the most complete dedicated to Godard until then- the same day the exhibition was opened to the public.

Those interested in the Godardian adventure at the Pompidou Center should check Morceaux de Conversation avec Jean Luc Godard by Alain Fleischer , Reportage amateur (maquette expo), short film codirected by Godard and Miéville and also Godard, le dos au musée essay by Anne Marquez which summarises the tumultous birth of this major event. Die hard fans will also need to look for Voluptes Grand Master by Korean Paris-based photograph Wori Seung Chol, the very rare unofficial official catalogue of the exhibition. Continue reading

Jean-Luc Godard & Jean-Pierre Gorin – Letter to Jane: An Investigation About a Still (1972)

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Synopsis:

A propaganda photo of Jane Fonda talking to, or perhaps listening to, a Vietnamese militant provides the jumping off point for one of cinema’s most stringent semiotic analyses in Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin’s singular Letter to Jane: An Investigation About a Still. Ostensibly an explanation of Godard’s choice to include a non-diegetic photograph of star Jane Fonda in his promotional materials for Tout va bien, the film is more accurately described as having not Fonda, but the entire apparatus of commercial image-making, as its real target. The basic question at hand here, “What role should intellectuals play in revolution?” is complicated by Godard’s insistence upon the power of media to provide latent insight into the uncaring, status-quo preserving power of capitalism. Continue reading

Jean-Luc Godard – Remerciements de Jean-Luc Godard à son Prix d’honneur du cinéma suisse (2015)

Jean-Luc Godard to receive Honorary Award

The 2015 Swiss Film Honorary Award will go to Jean-Luc Godard, one of cinema’s true visionaries and a virtuoso in the art of film editing, whose avant-garde work has inspired, and continues to inspire, generations of film makers the world over. Federal Councillor Alain Berset will present the legendary director with his “Quartz” trophy on 13 March during the official Swiss Film Award ceremony at the Bâtiment des Forces Motrices in Geneva.

The Federal Office of Culture will bestow the 2015 Swiss Film Honorary Award on Jean-Luc Godard, one of the founding fathers and leading lights of the French Nouvelle Vague. The award also comes with prize money of CHF 30,000. Continue reading

Marco Bellocchio, Bernardo Bertolucci, Jean-Luc Godard, Carlo Lizzani, Pier Paolo Pasolini – Amore e rabbia aka Love and Anger (1969)

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Synopsis:
Love and Anger is a collection of five stories that are the handiwork of directors that have made names for themselves in decidedly different ways among the annals of foreign cinema. The heavy hitters of the time are all on board, including Bernardo Bertolucci (The Last Emperor, Partner), Marco Bellocchio (Devil in the Flesh), Carlo Lizzani (Requiescant), Pier Paolo Pasolini (Salo), and, a huge treat, the legendary Jean-Luc Godard (Band of Outsiders, Breathless). Most of these films are extremely surreal, but they all have political undertones. This actually works out quite well, as even if you aren’t familiar with the political climate in Italy and France during the 1960s, you can revel in these masters’ liberal use of inventive imagery, much of which never comes completely together in a standard narrative structure. The actors come from a pair of renowned theater groups: the Living Theater and Andy Warhol Factory, and include Julian Beck, who made his mark in Hollywood as the creepy preacher in Poltergeist II. Continue reading

Jean-Luc Godard – Pierrot le fou (1965) (HD)

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Plot Outline :
Ferdinand Griffon is married with his wealthy Italian wife and has been recently fired from the television where he worked. His wife forces him to go to a party in the house of her influent father that wants to introduce Ferdinand to a potential employer. Her brother brings the babysitter Marianne Renoir to take care of their children. Ferdinand feels bored in the bourgeois party and borrows his brother-in-law’s car to return home. He meets Marianne, who was his lover five years ago and insists to call him Pierrot, and offers to take her home; however, he spends the night with her and finds that she is involved in smuggling weapons. When Marianne is chased by terrorists, they decide to travel to the beach without any money, leaving Paris and his family behind in a crazy journey to nowhere. Continue reading