Jean-Luc Godard

Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville – Soft and Hard (1986)

Jonathan Rosenbaum in the Chicago Reader wrote:
Soft and Hard (A Soft Conversation Between Two Friends on a Hard Subject)
Soft and Hard, a highly intimate 48-minute video made by Godard and Anne-Marie Mieville for English television three years later, shows Godard and Mieville at their home in rural Switzerland. In many ways the most intimate and domestic of Godard’s works, it broaches the matter of what distinguishes film from video. Can be viewed in retrospect as necessary preludes to his recently completed magnum opus, the eight-part Histoire(s) du cinema. Read More »

Various – Ponts de Sarajevo AKA Bridges of Sarajevo (2014)

13 European directors explore the theme of Sarajevo and what this city represents in European history over the past hundred years, and what Sarajevo incarnates today in Europe. From different generations and origins, these eminent filmmakers offer many singular styles and visions. François Schuiten, famous Belgian comic book artist (Cities of the Fantastic) imagined animated cartoon links in between these films, a metaphoric transposition in his graphically luxuriant world of the emblematic bridges of the city of Sarajevo. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville – L’Enfance de l’Art (1993)

A woman, a child, a man and another child, the noise of bombs falling and of planes passing by, in a urban landscape destroyed by war.
A man dies before he had time to write on the back of La liberté guidant le peuple de Delacroix: that could be the plot, just the enigma consisting of a missing word. A question opened before death, resolved by a child, the shadow and spirit of Gavroche. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Moments choisis des histoire(s) du cinéma (2004)

NYT wrote:
Cinematic visionary and provocateur Jean-Luc Godard offers a typically challenging look at his favorite creative medium in the wake of the 20th Century in this ambitious blend of film, video, and collage. Moments Choisis des Histoire(s) du Cinema serves as both a history and critical examination of the cinema in the form of a collection of “chosen moments” from films that may or may not exist. It also offers a self-reflexive analysis of the filmmaker’s own life and work. Moments Choisis des Histoire(s) du Cinema received its American premier in a special screening at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Le petit soldat AKA The Little Soldier (1963)



During the Algerian War, Bruno Forestier lives in Geneva to escape the enlistment in France. Working for French intelligence, he is ordered to kill Palivoda, who is pro-FLN (National Liberation Front of Algeria), to prove he is not a double agent. Refusal and hesitation keep him from carrying out the assassination.

Meanwhile, he meets and falls in love with Véronica Dreyer, who helped the FLN. Bruno plans to leave with her for Brazil, but is captured and tortured by Algerian revolutionaries.

He escapes, and agrees to kill Palivoda for the French in exchange for passage to Brazil for himself and Veronica. However, the French discover Veronica’s ties to the FLN, and torture her to death. (Wikipedia) Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Le livre d’image AKA The Image Book (2018)



Do you still remember how, long ago, we trained our thoughts? Most often we’d start from a dream. We wondered how, in total darkness, colours of such intensity could emerge within us. In a soft, low voice. Saying great things. Surprising, deep and accurate matters. Image and words. Like a bad dream written on a stormy night. Under western eyes. The lost paradises. War is here. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Hélas pour moi AKA Oh, Woe Is Me (1993)



By 1993, cinema had become a language unto itself; it was a language that was made up of not only words, but also sounds and images. As cinema history continues, the language has expanded time after time due to the talents and experiments of master filmmakers such as Jean-Luc Godard. All throughout his vast, decade spanning career, Godard has made film upon film, and with each decade of Godard that passes by, the more radical his style becomes. If ever there was a filmmaker that I could say took the cinematic language to Joycean heights, that filmmaker is, without question, Godard. With “Oh, Woe Is Me”, Godard practically makes the cinematic equivalent of James Joyce’s “Finnegans Wake” by crafting a masterpiece that works as a perplexing jigsaw puzzle, one injected with all kinds of clever jokes as well as sections of poetic beauty. (From IMDb) Read More »