Jean-Luc Godard

Olivier Bohler & Céline Gailleurd – Jean-Luc Godard, le désordre exposé (2013)

André Labarthe part à la recherche de Godard et de son “Voyage(s) en utopie”, installation inachevée du cinéaste au Centre Georges- Pompidou en 2006. Le film crée l’illusion d’une discussion entre les deux hommes. Extraits de films et entretiens composent ce voyage passionnant dans le temps et l’oeuvre godardiens. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – La chinoise [+commentary] (1967)

Synopsis:
Born in a decade of political turmoil, La Chinoise has become a cinematic marker for the significant historical events that surrounded its creation. Five Parisian students, their political awareness aroused by Chairman Mao’s Little Red Book and the Chinese Cultural Revolution, envision an overthrow of Western governmental systems – which they aim to bring about through acts of terrorism. One of Godard’s most brilliant films of the 60s, its success lies in the rejection of traditional narrative techniques: it is a dialectical charade which is as disturbing as it is comical. Though criticised in its day as a political manipulation, La Chinoise has proven alarmingly prophetic and its impact on audiences during the late 60s is echoed amongst viewers today. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Charlotte et son Jules AKA Charlotte and Her Boyfriend (1960)

“Charlotte et son Jules was made the year before Breathless and in many ways prefigures the arrival of that major film. Shot entirely in or from a single hotel room, it centres on Jules, played by Jean-Paul Belmondo who delivers a rapid-fire tirade about his girlfriend and their relationship when she turns up back in the apartment. The poverty of the production is indicated by the fact that the voice of the Belmondo character is that of Godard himself. But its machine gun dialogue and restless jump-cutting camera is almost an advance preview of the long sort of love scene between Michel and Patricia in Patricia’s tiny apartment in Breathless.” Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Masculin féminin aka Masculine Feminine (1966)

A romance between young Parisians, shown through a series of vignettes. Read More »

Groupe Dziga Vertov & Jean-Luc Godard & Jean-Pierre Gorin – Vladimir et Rosa (1971)

Quote:

Vladimir and Rosa was in many ways the last true product of the experimental revolutionary filmmaking cooperative the Dziga Vertov Group: the final film produced under the group’s banner before Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin went on to make the feature Tout va bien and the short Letter To Jane under their own names, before parting ways for good. Taking its title from Vladimir Lenin and Rosa Luxemburg, this film is typical of Godard and Gorin’s late 60s/early 70s collaborations. That is to say, it’s shrill, antagonistic, messy and often intentionally grating, as dense and complex as it is difficult and polemical. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Sauve qui peut (la vie) AKA Every Man For Himself (1980)

Quote:
During the 1970’s Jean Luc Godard abandoned the notion of making normal commercial films for cinematic distribution in favour of his Marxist-Leninist ‘Dziga Vertov’ propaganda films. The director returned to regular filmmaking in 1980 with Sauve Qui Peut (La Vie), his first theatrical release since his furious outburst against modern bourgeois society in 1967 with Weekend. Delivering another hate-filled attack on almost every aspect of modern society, it’s like he had never been away. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Le livre d’image AKA The Image Book (2018) (HD)

IMDB wrote:
Nothing but silence.
Nothing but a revolutionary song.
A story in five chapters like the five fingers of a hand. Read More »