John Sturges

John Sturges – The Great Escape (1963)

Summary:
Based on a true story by Paul Brickhill, this epic adventure about a mass escape planned by Allied officers being kept in an elite German P.O.W. camp, especially designed to prevent it, is a great World War II movie spectacle. John Sturges directed the film whose screenplay was in part written by James Clavell. The all star cast makes every storyline interesting and includes: Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasence, James Coburn, and David McCallum among others. Though it’s only Oscar recognition was a nomination for Editing, its score is also memorable. #19 on AFI’s Most Heart-Pounding Movies list. Read More »

    John Sturges & Fred Zinnemann – The Old Man and the Sea (1958)

    Quote:
    An old Cuban fisherman’s dry spell is broken when he hooks a gigantic fish that drags him out to sea. Based on Ernest Hemingway’s story. Read More »

      John Sturges – Joe Kidd (1972)

      Synopsis:
      Joe Kidd (Clint Eastwood) is a former bounty hunter and all-around tough-guy in the American southwest. When a band of Mexicans find their U.S. land claims denied and all relevant records destroyed in a courthouse fire, they turn to force-of-arms. Luis Chama (John Saxon) is their charismatic leader, spouting revolutionary rhetoric and demanding land reform. A wealthy landowner with interests in the disputed area, Frank Harlan (Robert Duvall), decides to settle things his own way. He hires a band of killers and wants Joe Kidd to help them track Chama. Initially, Kidd wants to avoid any involvement, until Chama makes the mistake of stealing Kidd’s horses and terrorizing his friends. Read More »

        John Sturges – The People Against O’Hara (1951)

        Synopsis:
        Jim Curtayne, formerly a successful criminal defense attorney and currently a recovering alcoholic, has turned to civil law because of his problems with the bottle, daughter Ginny delays marrying in order to keep her dad on the straight and narrow, but when the son of neighborhood friends is accused of murder, he is lured into returning to criminal law. Complications arise as the initially overconfident Curtayne experiences lapses inn memory and judgment as well as an uncooperative client. He finds himself well over his head as he tries to reclaim his self-confidence and professional standing. Read More »

          John Sturges – The Magnificent Seven [+commentary] (1960)

          Synopsis:
          A remake of “The Seven Samurai.” Seven men are picked to defend a Mexican village from banditos that come every now and then to take whatever the town has grown since their last visit. When they are hired, they go to the town and teach the villagers how to defend themselves. When the leader of the bandits comes, they fight him and his men off. The second time he comes, the villagers give the seven to them, due to a heated argument. The leader of the bandits takes their guns and throws them out of town. He gives them horses and gives their guns back to them when they are far out of town. The seven decide that they aren’t going to run, and head back to the village for a final showdown. Read More »

            John Sturges – Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957)

            Synopsis:
            After a long career as a lawman that made him a legend, Wyatt Earp decides to quit and join his brothers in Tombstone, Arizona. There he would see them in a feud with the Clantons, a local clan of thugs and cattle thieves. When the showdown becomes inevitable, the help will come from Doc Holliday, a terminally-ill gambler who happens to be another Wild West legend. Read More »

              John Sturges – Right Cross (1950)

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              Plot Synopsis by Hal Erickson
              Right Cross stars Dick Powell as cynical sportswriter Rick Gavery and Powell’s wife June Allyson as boxing manager Pat O’Malley. Subbing for her incapacitated father (Lionel Barrymore), Pat grooms prizefighter Johnny Monterez (Ricardo Montalban) for the championship. Johnny holds a grudge against the world because he feels that his Mexican heritage has made him an outcast, though curiously the audience never sees any prejudice levelled against him. Gradually, Pat falls in love with the tempestuous Monterez, while Gavery, who’s always carried a torch for Pat, observes from the sidelines. The film wisely avoids the usual boxing-flick cliches, most commendably during the climactic Big Bout. Marilyn Monroe appears unbilled in the opening scene as Dick Powell’s dinner companion. Read More »