Lindsay Anderson – If…. (1968)

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“A modern classic in which Anderson minutely captures both the particular ethos of a public school and the general flavour of any structured community, thus achieving a clear allegorical force without sacrificing a whit of his exploration of an essentially British institution. The impeccable logic of the conclusion is in no way diminished by having been lifted from Vigo’s Zéro de Conduite, made thirty-five years earlier.” – Time Out London Continue reading

Lindsay Anderson – In Celebration (1975)

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from allmovie:
One of the more cinematic entries in the mid-1970s American Film Theatre series, In Celebration is adapted from the play by David Storey. Lindsay Anderson, who directed the original stage version, reassembles his cast for this filmization. Alan Bates, James Bolam and Brian Cox play Andrew, Colin and Steven, the well-educated sons of roughhewn coal miner “Mr. Shaw” (Bill Owen) and his wife (Constance Chapman). On the occasion of their parents’ wedding anniversary, the three sons return to their dank little home village. All three boys have become successful, but only Bolam is comfortable with his success. To his parents’ dismay, Andrew announces that he has given up his law practice to become an artist; he also confesses to harboring homosexual inclinations. Prompted by the embittered Andrew, the other sons churn up memories of their childhood that they–and their parents–had hoped to keep buried. — Hal Erickson Continue reading

Lindsay Anderson – Thursday’s Children (1954)

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Monday’s child is fair of face,
Tuesday’s child is full of grace;
Wednesday’s child is full of woe,
Thursday’s child has far to go.

Quote:

Narrated by Richard Burton, Thursday’s Children is a documentary about the Royal School for the Deaf in Margate, England. Filmed without sound and using narration sparingly, the documentary explores the silent world of these children (and their teachers) as they come to learn what sound is, even before they are able to articulate anything themselves. The narration explains that there can be no thought without words, only feelings, and that sounds must be taught visually, through pictures or example, or experienced through vibrations. The bulk of the film, however, concerns itself with the determination of the children and the joy they feel when their attempts at communication produce breakthroughs. ~ Craig Butler, All Movie Guide Continue reading

Lindsay Anderson – Free Cinema, 1956 – ? An Essay on Film by Lindsay Anderson (1985)

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A documentary about the history of the Free Cinema movement, made by one of it’s greatest proponents, Lindsay Anderson, to commemorate British Film Year in 1985.

Produced by Kevin Brownlow and David Gill.

Unlike Richard Attenborough’s celebratory episode of the same series, or Alan Parker’s more aggressive show, which was balanced between celebrating the greats and attacking Parker’s bugbears, Greenaway and Jarman and the BFI, Anderson’s show accentuates the negative, painting an image of a British cinema in terminal artistic decline and trashing the ambitions and approach of British Film Year itself. It’s mordantly funny and very savage. Continue reading

Lindsay Anderson – The Whales of August (1987)

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Lindsay Anderson’s The Whales of August stars silent film legend Lillian Gish, in her 95th year, and Bette Davis, 79, as widowed sisters, one warm and supportive, the other cold and cantankerous, who have been coming to a small cottage on the Maine seacoast for sixty years. Every August, they watch the journey of the whales passing in the nearby waters together but the sense is that this may be their last summer together. Knowing that their time is limited, the siblings attempt to resolve long-standing differences but face many obstacles. The Whales of August takes place during the course of a single day and the camera stays mostly inside the house except to follow the sisters on occasional walks to the ocean. It all sounds static but there is a great deal of emotion churning beneath the surface.
Continue reading