Maurice Pialat – La gueule ouverte AKA The Mouth Agape (1974) (HD)

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Monique Mélinand portrays a woman in the late stages of terminal illness. Her son Philippe (Philippe Léotard), Philippe’s wife Nathalie (Nathalie Baye), and her husband Roger (Hubert Deschamps) attempt to comfort her as she navigates through her ordeal. However, those two closest men in her personal life begin to get more involved in their relationships with multiple mistresses. Her husband flirts with customers in their clothing and haberdashery store while her son flirts with her nurses. The film incorporates elements of Mozart’s opera Così fan tutte to poetic effect, relating to these scenes. In the end scenes, she goes through several final, deeply emotional moments as the disease claims her life. (Wikipedia) Continue reading

Maurice Pialat – La Maison des bois [Chapters 4 – 7] (1971)

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Quote:
Compared by critics to Jean Renoir and Ken Loach,
French director-actor Maurice Pialat is now recognised
as one of world cinema’s profoundly humanists
filmmakers. Pialat was born into the same filmmaking
generation as Nouvelle Vague icons Godard and
Truffaut, or the “Left Bank” filmmaking movement’s
Alain Resnais and Chris Marker. But having trained as a
director of observational documentary, Pialat turned
away from the intellectual play and cinephillia of his
peers. Instead, in landmark films such as POLICE
(1985), the Cannes-winning SOUS LE SOLEIL DE SATAN
(1987) and VAN GOGH (1991) he evolved a style that’s
may become contemporary cinema’s most influential: a
cinema of naturalism, spiritual passion and
instinctive social engagement. Continue reading

Maurice Pialat – La maison des bois (Chapters 1- 3) (1971)

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Quote:
Compared by critics to Jean Renoir and Ken Loach,
French director-actor Maurice Pialat is now recognised
as one of world cinema’s profoundly humanists
filmmakers. Pialat was born into the same filmmaking
generation as Nouvelle Vague icons Godard and
Truffaut, or the “Left Bank” filmmaking movement’s
Alain Resnais and Chris Marker. But having trained as a
director of observational documentary, Pialat turned
away from the intellectual play and cinephillia of his
peers. Instead, in landmark films such as POLICE
(1985), the Cannes-winning SOUS LE SOLEIL DE SATAN
(1987) and VAN GOGH (1991) he evolved a style that’s
may become contemporary cinema’s most influential: a
cinema of naturalism, spiritual passion and
instinctive social engagement. Continue reading

Maurice Pialat – Les Courts Métrages Turcs AKA The Turkish Chronicles (1964)

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Before he turned to feature filmmaking in 1968 with Naked Childhood, Pialat worked on a series of short films, many of them financed by French television. TURKISH CHRONICLES is a compendium of four pieces shot in Turkey. Corne D’Or juxtaposes a poem by Nerval with a powerful study of Ottoman architecture; Istanbul takes into the crowded streets and back alleys of a fascinating city divided between continents. Byzance uses a text by Stefan Zweig to describe the Ottoman conquest of the city in 1453; Maitre Galip is another on Pialat’s perceptive studies of children that includes a poem by Turkish poet Nazim Hikmet. Continue reading