Mexico

Carlos Reygadas – Adulte (1998)

A man, a coffin, a cliff. Bunuelian and surrealist in tone, yet not without humour.
A short film, shot in black & white 8mm. Read More »

Carlos Reygadas – Japón (2002)

Quote:
In this preternaturally assured feature debut by Carlos Reygadas, a man (Alejandro Ferretis) travels from Mexico City to an isolated village to commit suicide; once there, however, he meets a pious elderly woman (Magdalena Flores) whose quiet humanity incites a reawakening of his desires. Recruiting a cast of nonactors and filming in sublime 16 mm CinemaScope, Reygadas explores the harsh beauty of the Mexican country­side with earthy tactility, conjuring a psychic landscape where religion mingles with sex, life coexists with death, and the animal and spiritual sides of human experience become indistinguishable. A work of soaring ambition and startling visual poetry, Japón is an existential journey through uncharted cinematic territory that established the singular voice of its director. Read More »

Ricardo Silva – Navajazo (2014) (HD)

The imagined apocalypse presented to us through portraits of characters struggling to survive in a hostile environment, where all they have is each other, and the only thing they posses in common is the will to keep on living, no matter the cost. (IMDB) Read More »

Carlos Reygadas – Nuestro tiempo AKA Our Time (2018)

A family lives in the Mexican countryside raising fighting bulls. Esther is in charge of running the ranch, while her husband Juan, a world-renowned poet, raises and selects the beasts. When Esther becomes infatuated with a horse trainer named Phil, the couple struggles to stride through the emotional crisis. Read More »

Emilio Fernández – Flor silvestre AKA Wild Flower (1943)

Hal Erickson@allmovie.com:
Completed before his immensely successful Maria Candelaria, Emilio Fernandez’ Flor Sylvestre was released second in the US-and not until two years after its initial Mexican release. Also known as Wildflower, the film features Fernandez himself as a character named Rogellio Torres. The lion’s share of the footage, however, is devoted to the romance between Esperanza (Dolores Del Rio), granddaughter of a common laborer, and Jose Luis Castro (Pedro Armendariz), the firebrand son of a landowner. Joining a revolutionary movements, Castro is disowned by his father, but Esperanza remains loyally by his side. Later on, Castro’s father is killed by outlaws; in seeking vengeance, he sacrifices his own life, while Esperanza carries on his revolutionary work with their young son in tow. Read More »

Alejandro Jodorowsky – Santa sangre [+Commentary] (1989)

Quote:
Does the prolonged gestation period account for the bulging-valise feel of Alejandro Jodorowsky’s seething, gore-drenched carnivale? Not really — all of his pictures seem deliberately shaped to let the fantasies spill over once poured in, and this lushly scabrous murkfest, made after nearly a decade of inactivity, is true to the molten-lava of Jodorowsky’s imagination. As in his ’70s freakouts, the movie follows the trajectory of the subconscious, namely Fenix’s (as in “rising from the ashes,” and played at different ages by the filmmaker’s sons, Axel and Adan), first spotted perched nekkid atop a tree in the asylum. Cue flashback, and the parade of candy-colored melodrama surging out of the “Circo del Gringo,” traumas piling up on little Fenix’s innocence via his bloated, randy cowboy dad (Guy Stockwell) and his fervid-eyed mom (Blanca Guerra), who, when not dangling from a trapeze by her hair, presides over an order of fanatics worshipping an armless martyr. Read More »

Emilio Fernández – Río Escondido AKA Hidden River (1948)

allmovie.com review
Filmed in 1947, Emilio Fernandez’ Hidden River (originally Rio Escondido) was distributed in the U.S. three years later. The matchless Maria Felix stars as Rosaura, an idealistic Mexican schoolteacher who does her best to educate the illiterate Indians in her native land. Rosaura is opposed by several authority figures who have no intention of losing their hold over the Indians, but she finds support in the form of a kindly priest. Director Fernandez’ understanding of and sensitivity towards Mexico’s teeming millions of unfortunates enables Hidden River to rise above its occasional cliches and unsubtleties. The cinematography is by Gabriel Figueroa, who like Emilio Fernandez and Maria Felix is a legendary figure in the Mexican cinema. Read More »