Milos Forman – Lásky jedné plavovlásky AKA Loves of a Blonde (1965)

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The flirtatious title of Milos Forman’s breakthrough comedy Loves of a Blonde says a lot about the film without even trying. Everybody in Forman’s bittersweet film thinks about sex constantly but only in terms of hypothetical scenarios that almost never come to pass. The funny thing about these daydreams of coitus is that they’re not strictly sexy. In fact, most of the time characters in Loves of a Blonde are wringing their hands about sex, even the trio of homely soldiers licking their lips at the thought of seducing a table of bored blondes at a local dance. First they send alcohol to the wrong table and are subsequently unsure of how long they should smile at the girls they plan on getting drunk and taking to the woods (they aren’t even sure if the idea of taking girls to the woods for sex is just a euphemism or not). Sex is comedy here because it breeds nothing but the kind of anxiety that the title of Forman’s film teems with. Continue reading

Milos Forman – Amadeus [Director’s Cut + Extras] (1984)

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Synopsis: For this film adaptation of Peter Shaffer’s Broadway hit, director Milos Forman returned to the city of Prague that he’d left behind during the Czech political crises of 1968, bringing along his usual cinematographer and fellow Czech expatriate, Miroslav Ondricek. Amadeus is an expansion of a Viennese “urban legend” concerning the death of 18th-century musical genius Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. From the vantage point of an insane asylum, aging royal composer Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) recalls the events of three decades earlier, when the young Mozart (Tom Hulce) first gained favor in the court of Austrian emperor Joseph II (Jeffrey Jones). Salieri was incensed that God would bless so vulgar and obnoxious a young snipe as Mozart with divine genius. Why was Salieri–so disciplined, so devoted to his art, and so willing to toady to his superiors–not touched by God? Unable to match Mozart’s talent, Salieri uses his influence in court to sabotage the young upstart’s career. Disguising himself as a mysterious benefactor, Salieri commissions the backbreaking “Requiem,” which eventually costs Mozart his health, wealth, and life. Among the film’s many pearls of dialogue, the best line goes to the Emperor, who rejects a Mozart composition on the grounds that it has “too many notes.” Amadeus won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Actor for F. Murray Abraham. In 2002, the film received a theatrical re-release as “Amadeus: The Director’s Cut,” a version that includes 22 minutes of additional footage. -Hal Erickson (AMG) Continue reading