Mumblecore

Frank V. Ross – Audrey the Trainwreck (2010)

The story of two people caught in the routines of work and circles of friends. The days begin with an alarm and ends with the fading sound of a television. Ron Hogan, a 28 year old ATM parts purchaser, and Stacy Ryan, a 27 year old, oddly charming courier, meet through a match making Internet service and go through the routine of falling for one another. Read More »

Azazel Jacobs – Momma’s Man (2008)

One of the Best Films of 2008 –Entertainment Weekly, Time Out NY, NY Post

modestly scaled movie with a heart the size of the Ritz – New York Times
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Andrew Bujalski – Beeswax (2009)

Quote:
Beeswax is Bujalski’s third feature and the first to be conceived and shot since Funny Ha Ha (2002) and Mutual Appreciation (2003) turned him into a rising indie star. For the most part, it’s just as insular and homogeneous as any of the films Taubin rapped in Film Comment. It takes place in Austin, Texas, the little countercultural cocoon that launched Bujalski’s career, and most of the action centers on a funky little vintage clothing boutique favored by college students and the like. Its primary characters are all young, straight, white, middle-class, and college educated. And like so many other mumblecore movies, Beeswax is largely preoccupied with sexual and romantic maneuvering, as a young couple who’ve broken up circle each other tentatively and get back together. Read More »

Andrew Bujalski – Mutual Appreciation [+Extras] (2005)

Indie film wunderkind Andrew Bujalski’s best attribute as a filmmaker is not his much-heralded ability to reproduce the idiomatic lingo and speech patterns of his stuck-in-neutral twentysomething subjects—who, to this ear, always sound a bit too self-consciously aimless and uncomfortable to pass as authentic—but, rather, his knack for unearthing subtle insights about interpersonal relations from meandering, seemingly improvised conversational scenes. Mutual Appreciation, the director’s follow-up to his breakthrough Funny Ha Ha, is a modest step up from its assured predecessor in both content and form, revealing discerning truths about, and wringing deadpan humor from, post-college anomie through a carefully arranged narrative structured around casual ellipses and sly symmetries, whether it be the juxtaposition of one evening’s dissimilar drunken parties or its pair of gender role reversal scenarios (one involving a man reading a woman’s short story, the other marked by some sloshed cross-dressing). Read More »

Joanna Arnow – i hate myself :) (2013)

Quote:
Nebbishy filmmaker Joanna Arnow documents her yearlong relationship with a racially charged poet-provocateur. What starts out as an uncomfortably intimate portrait of a dysfunctional relationship and protracted mid-twenties adolescence, quickly turns into a complex commentary on societal repression, sexuality and self-confrontation through art. Read More »

Dustin Guy Defa – Bad Fever (2011)

A humorless loner attempts to win the admiration of a drifter with his debut performance at the local comedy club

The Village Voice wrote:
The shaky handheld cinematography might be conventionally modern, but from its opening white-letters-on-red-background credit sequence to its diligent focus on a wayward loner drifting about the outskirts of society and sanity, Bad Fever has the empathetic soul of ’70s American filmmaking. Writer-director Dustin Guy Defa’s stark indie trains its character-study gaze on Eddie (Kentucker Audley), a socially dysfunctional twentysomething who—while living at home with his dour mom (Annette Wright), hanging out in empty diners, and entertaining stand-up comedy dreams by recording anecdotes on cassette—strikes up a random romance with Irene (Eleonore Hendricks), who lives in an abandoned school and has a fondness for kinky videotaping. Read More »

Susan Buice & Arin Crumley – Four Eyed Monsters (2005)

AMG: One couple’s rocky road toward togetherness is mapped in this comedy drama which melds elements of documentary and fiction. Arin (Arin Crumley) is a struggling independent filmmaker who pays the rent by shooting and editing wedding videos; he loathes the “four-eyed, two-mouthed, eight-limbed” beasts known as couples in love, but he would also prefer to be less lonely than he is. However, Arin is terrified of talking to women, and has a borderline phobia about sexually transmitted disease. On an Internet dating site, Arin meets Susan, (Susan Buice), an artist who wants to pursue a career in painting but in the meantime supports herself by waiting tables at a coffee shop. Susan’s attitudes about romance are only slightly more optimistic than Arin’s, but after exchanging photos and messages, the two sense they have something in common. Read More »