Mumblecore

Joanna Arnow – i hate myself :) (2013)

Quote:
Nebbishy filmmaker Joanna Arnow documents her yearlong relationship with a racially charged poet-provocateur. What starts out as an uncomfortably intimate portrait of a dysfunctional relationship and protracted mid-twenties adolescence, quickly turns into a complex commentary on societal repression, sexuality and self-confrontation through art. Read More »

Dustin Guy Defa – Bad Fever (2011)

A humorless loner attempts to win the admiration of a drifter with his debut performance at the local comedy club

The Village Voice wrote:
The shaky handheld cinematography might be conventionally modern, but from its opening white-letters-on-red-background credit sequence to its diligent focus on a wayward loner drifting about the outskirts of society and sanity, Bad Fever has the empathetic soul of ’70s American filmmaking. Writer-director Dustin Guy Defa’s stark indie trains its character-study gaze on Eddie (Kentucker Audley), a socially dysfunctional twentysomething who—while living at home with his dour mom (Annette Wright), hanging out in empty diners, and entertaining stand-up comedy dreams by recording anecdotes on cassette—strikes up a random romance with Irene (Eleonore Hendricks), who lives in an abandoned school and has a fondness for kinky videotaping. Read More »

Susan Buice & Arin Crumley – Four Eyed Monsters (2005)

AMG: One couple’s rocky road toward togetherness is mapped in this comedy drama which melds elements of documentary and fiction. Arin (Arin Crumley) is a struggling independent filmmaker who pays the rent by shooting and editing wedding videos; he loathes the “four-eyed, two-mouthed, eight-limbed” beasts known as couples in love, but he would also prefer to be less lonely than he is. However, Arin is terrified of talking to women, and has a borderline phobia about sexually transmitted disease. On an Internet dating site, Arin meets Susan, (Susan Buice), an artist who wants to pursue a career in painting but in the meantime supports herself by waiting tables at a coffee shop. Susan’s attitudes about romance are only slightly more optimistic than Arin’s, but after exchanging photos and messages, the two sense they have something in common. Read More »

Azazel Jacobs – Momma’s Man (2008)

One of the Best Films of 2008 –Entertainment Weekly, Time Out NY, NY Post

modestly scaled movie with a heart the size of the Ritz – New York Times
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Megan Boyle & Tao Lin – MDMA (2011)

Quote:
“MDMA is a one-shot experiment that begins with Lin and Boyle taking the titular drug and, in what appears to be an unedited two-hour shot, meander around Manhattan, getting lost on the subway and ending up giving each other a sarcastically ironic interview while on the ferris wheel inside Times Square’s Toys ‘R Us.” Read More »

Megan Boyle & Tao Lin – Bebe Zeva (2011)

Quote:
“Tao Lin and Megan Boyle follow 17-year-old fashion blogger Bebe Zeva around Las Vegas for a night and film it on a MacBook.”
“In the film, which took one night to film and 24 hours to edit, Tao Lin and Megan Boyle follow Zeva around her home city of Las Vegas. Zeva plays the part of compliant diva, welcoming them into her lavish condo then taking them through casinos, malls and Planet Hollywood as she’s filmed by Lin and Boyle with a MacBook while they ask her questions like, “How many Twitter followers does the toilet have?” “Would you rather weigh 500 pounds or not have two arms?” “Who has the best internet nose?” Sometimes you can’t hear what they’re saying. Sometimes there are jarring sounds as if the MacBook hit a wall accidentally. Read More »

Jay Duplass & Mark Duplass – The Puffy Chair (2005)

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From Time Out London
‘I’ve got about 50 fuckin’ thoughts and strategies about how some shit is and I don’t know fuckin’ shit.’ Such is the lament of Josh (Mark Duplass, who co-wrote the script with director brother Jay), a would-be indie rocker turned booking agent adrift in an indefinite state of petulant post-adolescence. Josh leads his doormat girlfriend, Emily (Kathryn Aselton), and his hippy-dippy brother, Rhett (Rhett Wilkins), on a quest to retrieve an eBay purchase: the titular piece of furniture, seemingly identical to one from Josh’s youth, and therefore a big red hint about the approximate end-point of everyone’s emotional development. Holding up a mirror to slacker-manqué solipsism isn’t necessarily much more intriguing than the thing in itself, but the Duplass brothers are merciless in digging pot holes and contriving road blocks for the claustrophobic, infuriating road trip that ensues. Josh and Emily’s curdled intimacy rings painfully true, and a memorably aborted dinner early on rhymes with the film’s perfectly abrupt ending; when everyone finally shuts up, the silence is startling. Read More »