Musical

Raoul Ruiz – Régime sans pain (1985)

Jonathan Rosenbaum from Essential Cinema: On the Necessity of Film Canons (2004), pp. 236-237:

Within my experience, Ruiz is the least neurotic of filmakers; he doesn’t even seem to care whether what he’s doing is good or not (and, as he’s aptly noted, bad work and good work generally entail the same amount of effort). No single film functions as the be-all or end-all of an evolving career but merely as part of an overall process. Example: the 1985 Régime sans pain — one of his films most influenced by his friend Jean Baudrillard, and perhaps the one that most calls to mind grade-Z SF — grew out of a commission to direct a music video. Ruiz offered a counterproposal that he direct several music videos rather than one; once this deal was made, he shot enough material to interconnect the various videos until he arrived at a feature. Read More »

Géza von Bolváry – Ein Tango für Dich (1930)

This is Willi Forst’s second collaboration with director Géza von Bolvary, made shortly after the far better known “Zwei Herzen im Dreivierteltakt” (in which he didn’t have first billing, though). Again, the script is by Walter Reisch and the music is by Robert Stolz.

In “Ein Tango für Dich”, Forst plays Jimmy Bolt, who is working as a singer and dancer (and occcasionally as a waiter) at a varieté. The man may be talented, but he’s not exactly a big success, and things get complicated when a young orphan girl (Fee Malten) falls in love with the voice of another singer (Oskar Karlweis) but then mistakes Bolt for him… Read More »

Richard Rush – Psych-Out (1968)

Quote:
Jennie (Susan Strasberg) travels to San Francisco to locate her hippie brother Steve (Bruce Dern). She meets Stoney (Jack Nicholson) in a coffeehouse and he helps her look for Steve, who Stoney has seen in his various attempts to start a rock & roll band. Stoney and his pals transform the square girl into a swinging hippie chick, complete with a mod miniskirt. Along with their buddy Dave (Dean Stockwell), they search for Steve amidst the psychedelic splendor of the Haight-Ashbury hippie haunts. Dave is killed by a car when he wanders around in an STP-induced stupor. Read More »

Joshua Logan – Camelot (1967)

Synopsis:
After the arranged marriage of Arthur (Richard Harris) and Guinevere (Vanessa Redgrave), the king gathers the noble knights of the realm to his Round Table. The dashing and stalwart Lancelot (Franco Nero) joins, but soon finds himself enraptured by the lovely Guinevere. When Arthur’s illegitimate son, Mordred (David Hemmings), reappears in the kingdom and outs the secret lovers, Arthur finds himself trapped by his own rules into taking action against his wife and closest friend. Read More »

Yvan Noé – Mademoiselle Mozart (1936)

This French musical comedy was based on the stage play Mademoiselle Mozart, written by Yvan Noe, who also co-directed the screen version. Danielle Darrieux plays Denise, the owner of a music shop that is facing closure. Wealthy young Maxime (Pierre Mingand) falls in love with Denise but knows full well that she despises rich folks and would refuse to accept his charity. Thus, Maxime arranges to secretly buy the store then takes a job with the establishment as a humble sheet-music salesman. When Denise finds out that her new employee is actually her boss, she is furious, but rest assured that Love Will Find a Way. The lovely Danielle Darrieux is permitted to sing on several occasions, which she does enthusiastically if not altogether expertly. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Read More »

Douglas Sirk – Das Hofkonzert AKA The Court Concert (1936)

From All Move Guide:
Before he became cult director Douglas Sirk, Detlef Sierck cut his teeth on such lavish European star vehicles as Hofkonzert (Court Concert). Marta Eggerth is cast as Christine, a young singer who aspires to find out who her father was. Her odyssey brings her to the court of a mythical kingdom, where she is romanced by handsome lieutenant Walter (Johannes Heesters). He is warned not to lose his heart to a “commoner,” but all turns out all right when King Serenissimus (Otto Tressler) turns out to be Christine’s long-lost daddy. Hofkonzert was designed as a comeback for Marta Eggerth, whose star had eclipsed by the mid-1930s. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Read More »

Walter Lang – The King and I (1956)

Synopsis:
Mrs. Anna Leonowens and her son Louis arrive in Bangkok, where she has been contracted to teach English to the children of the royal household. She threatens to leave when the house she had been promised is not available, but falls in love with the children. A new slave, a gift of a vassal king, translates “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” into a Siamese ballet. After expressing her unhappiness at being with the King, the slave decides to make an attempt to escape with her lover. Anna and the King start to fall in love, but her headstrong upbringing inhibits her from joining his harem. She is just about to leave Siam but something important she finds out makes her think about changing her mind. Read More »