Musical

Antonio Carlos da Fontoura – Somos Tão Jovens AKA We are So Young (2013)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:
We are So Young (Portuguese: Somos tão Jovens) is a 2013 Brazilian biographical drama film about Brazilian singer Renato Russo. The film does not follow the life of Renato Russo. The focus is his adolescence, his physical problems and the discover of his love for music. It is directed by Antônio Carlos da Fontoura, written by Marcos Bernstein and starring Thiago Mendonça and Laila Zaid. Was released in Brazilian theaters by distributors Imagem Filmes and Fox Film on May 3, 2013.[3] Read More »

Ana Lily Amirpour – Yo! My Saint (2018)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

A musical exploring the complex relationship between an artist and his muse.
Read More »

Charles Reisner – Chasing Rainbows (1930)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Plot: The road-show troupe of a top Broadway show go cross-country while taking the audience along on the on-stage scenes as well as what happens and is happening back stage of the production. The spectacular dancing ensembles and colorful costumes and pulchritude on-stage offers a contrasting background to the drabness of the backstage, where joy, sorrow, tragedies, deception, and romance are intertwined. Written by Les Adams Read More »

Garin Nugroho – Opera Jawa AKA Requiem from Java [+Extras] (2006)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Synopsis:
Siti (Artika Sari Devi) and Setio (Martinus Miroto) are a married couple living in a small village. They were once dancers in plays depicting the Ramayana, but have since retired from the stage to sell earthenware pottery.

Siti used to play the part of Sita, the wife of Prince Rama, whom Setio portrayed. In an episode from the Ramayana, Siti becomes the object of desire of evil King Ravana and is abducted by him.

The events of the Ramayana are paralleled in the characters’ real lives when Ludiro (Eko Supriyanto), a butcher who rules over all the village’s business affairs, tries to seduce Siti. Read More »

Ken Hughes – Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Plot Synopsis by Paul Brenner

One of the stars of Walt Disney’s Mary Poppins, Dick Van Dyke, is re-united with that film’s composer and lyricist, Richard M.Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, in this big budget and bloodless children’s fantasy musical, based on the children’s book by James Bond author Ian Fleming. Van Dyke plays Caractacus Potts, a failed inventor who lives in a big house with his two children — Jemima Heather Ripley and Jeremy Adrian Hall — and eccentric father Lionel Jeffries. Potts has to raise 30 shillings so his children can buy a broken-down racing car from the junkyard. After a disastrous attempt to sell his invention of whistling sweets to Lord Scrumptious (James Robertson-Justice), the local candy maker, he finally gets enough money for the car by doing a Dick Van Dyke dance routine at the county fair. Potts takes the car and miraculously transforms the vehicle into a shiny new car named Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. While on a picnic with the children and Truly Scrumptious (Sally Ann Howes), Lord Scrumptious’ beautiful daughter, Potts concocts a fantasy tale about the magical powers of the car, which can now float on water and fly. In the tale, Baron Bomburst (Gert Frobe) wants the car for himself and kidnaps the automobile and the inventor. But Bomburst captures Grandpa by mistake along with the wrong car, so Potts, Truly, and the children have to enlist Chitty Chitty Bang Bang on a rescue mission to Bomburst’s lair to save Grandpa. Read More »

Lloyd Bacon – Footlight Parade (1933)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Plot Synopsis [AMG] The last—and to some aficionados, the best—of choreographer Busby Berkeley’s three Warner Bros. efforts of 1933, Footlight Parade stars James Cagney as a Broadway musical comedy producer. Cagney is unceremoniously put out of business when talking pictures arrive. To keep his head above water, Jimmy hits upon a swell idea: he’ll stage musical “prologues” for movie theatres, then ship them out to the various picture palaces in New York. Halfway through the picture, Cagney is obliged to assemble three mammoth prologues and present them back-to-back in three different theatres. There are all sorts of backstage intrigues, not the least of which concerns the predatory hijinks of gold-digger Claire Dodd and the covetous misbehavior of Cagney’s ex-wife Renee Whitney. Joan Blondell plays Jimmy’s faithful girl-friday, who loves him from afar; Ruby Keeler is the secretary who takes off her glasses and is instantly transformed into a glamorous stage star; Dick Powell is the “protege” of wealthy Ruth Donnelly, who makes good despite this handicap; Frank McHugh is Cagney’s assistant, who spends all his time moaning “It’ll never work”; and Hugh Herbert is a self-righteous censor, who ends up in a censurable position. The last half-hour of Footlight Parade is a nonstop display of Busby Berkeley at his most spectacular: the three big production numbers, all written by Harry Warren and Al Dubin, are “By a Waterfall”, “Honeymoon Hotel”, and “Shanghai Lil”, the latter featuring some delicious pre-code scatology, a tap-dance duet by Cagney and Keeler, and an out-of-left-field climactic salute to FDR and the NRA! Read More »

Tony Palmer – All My Loving (1968)

Free Image Hosting at www.ImageShack.us

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Film Threat:

Tony Palmer’s landmark 1968 BBC documentary on the icons of the era’s rock orbit is finally receiving its DVD premiere. Nearly four decades after its first broadcast, “All My Loving” still resonates with the wonderful and inane excesses of that loud, vibrant world.

The focus here is primarily on British rock legends (the genre is called “pop music” throughout the film). Slices of classic performance and eccentric interviews are combined to create a trippy, psychedelic experience. Read More »