Delmer Daves – The Red House (1947)

Ex9RQb Delmer Daves   The Red House (1947)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Delmer Daves   The Red House (1947)

PLOT SYNOPSIS
Pete and Ellen have reared Meg as their own, ever since she was a baby and her parents took off. Now a teen, Meg convinces her friend Nath to come help with chores on the farm: Pete isn’t getting around on his wooden leg like he used to. When Nath insists on using a short cut home through the woods, Pete gets quite agitated and warns him of screams in the night, of terrors associated with the red house. Curious, Meg and Nath ignore his warnings and begin exploring. Meg begins falling in love with Nath, but his girlfriend Tibby has other plans for him. Meanwhile they all get closer to real danger and the dark secret of the red house. Continue reading

Rafael Baledón – El pantano de las ánimas aka Swamp of the Lost Souls (1957)

 Rafael Baledón   El pantano de las ánimas aka Swamp of the Lost Souls (1957)

thgc Rafael Baledón   El pantano de las ánimas aka Swamp of the Lost Souls (1957)

A small Mexican village faces the disappearance of a corpse. The dead man’s brother goes out to find his detective friend, a cowboy. However, he is killed by a gang that seeks to get the insurance money from the policy put on the dead man by his aunt. Meanwhile, a strange fish-man monster is stalking our heroes with the intent to kill! Can the cowboy solve the mystery in time?
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Claude Chabrol – Les biches aka Bad Girls [+Extras] (1968)

jbpe Claude Chabrol   Les biches aka Bad Girls [+Extras] (1968)

thgc Claude Chabrol   Les biches aka Bad Girls [+Extras] (1968)

By Roger Ebert / January 16, 1969

Claude Chabrol’s “Les Biches” depends almost entirely on style, and as style it succeeds. He is not so much interested in his story as in how to tell it. He favors muted colors, mostly pastels, and many of his scenes are shot in the light of late afternoon.

His characters fit these colors and moods; they seem in a trance sometimes, moving slowly, speaking absently. And his camera movement is meticulously planned. We notice scenes where the camera and the actors move together in a sort of minuet. Three or four shots, using steps we don’t see or mirrors we don’t expect, have the grace of dance.

Chabrol is often considered the father of the French New Wave. He is known over here for “Les Cousins” (1959), “Les Bonnes Femmes” (1960) and last year’s “The Champagne Murders.” Unlike his colleagues in the New Wave (Godard, Truffaut, Resnais) he has steered away from politics and into a very smooth, almost ethereal directing style. “Les Biches,” a success at the 1968 New York Film Festival, ranks with his best work. Continue reading

pixel Claude Chabrol   Les biches aka Bad Girls [+Extras] (1968)