Otto Preminger

Otto Preminger – Angel Face (1952)

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Synopsis:
Ambulance driver Frank Jessup (Robert Mitchum) meets the wealthy and beautiful Diane Tremayne (Jean Simmons) while on a call to tend to her stepmother Catherine (Barbara O’Neill), who may have tried to commit suicide. Frank quits his job and stands up his fiancée Mary Wilton (Mona Freeman) to become the Tremayne’s chauffeur — where he can be close to Diane. The longer Frank hangs around, the more he comes to suspect that Diane idolizes her father Charles (Herbert Marshall) and wants to murder her mother. But Frank is too much in love with Diane to do anything about it.

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Otto Preminger – Bonjour Tristesse (1958)

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from allmovie:
“Francoise Sagan’s bittersweet novel Bonjour Tristesse is given a sumptuous Riviera-filmed screen treatment. David Niven plays a wealthy playboy, the father of teenaged libertine-in-the-making Jean Seberg. Seberg tolerates most of her father’s mistresses, but doesn’t know what to make of the prudish Deborah Kerr, who will not cohabit with Niven until after they’re married. Feeling that her own relation with her father will be disrupted by Kerr’s presence, Seberg does her malicious best to break up the relationship–only to be beaten to the punch by Niven, who despite his promises of fidelity to Kerr cannot give up his hedonistic lifestyle. The combination of the daughter’s disdain and the father’s rakishness drive Kerr to suicide. Niven and Seberg continue pursuing their lavish but empty lifestyle, though both realize that their lack of moral fibre has destroyed a life. The incestuous undertones of the original Sagan novel are only slightly downplayed in the film version; the “tristesse” (sadness) is visually conveyed by filming the Deborah Kerr flashback scenes in color and the opening and closing of the film in bleak black and white. Bonjour Tristesse was codirected by Otto Preminger, who’d previously discovered Jean Seberg for his benighted 1957 filmization of Saint Joan. Read More »

Otto Preminger – Laura [+Extras] (1944)

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by Hal Erickson
This adaptation of Vera Caspary’s suspense novel was begun by director Rouben Mamoulien and cinematographer Lucien Ballard, but thanks to a complex series of backstage intrigues and hostilities, the film was ultimately credited to director Otto Preminger and cameraman Joseph LaShelle (who won an Oscar for his efforts). At the outset of the film, it is established that the title character, Laura Hunt (Gene Tierney), has been murdered. Tough New York detective Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews) investigates the killing, methodically questioning the chief suspects: Waspish columnist Waldo Lydecker (Clifton Webb), wastrel socialite Shelby Carpenter (Vincent Price), and Carpenter’s wealthy “patroness” Ann Treadwell (Judith Anderson). The deeper he gets into the case, the more fascinated he becomes by the enigmatic Laura, literally falling in love with the girl’s painted portrait. As he sits in Laura’s apartment, ruminating over the case and his own obsessions, the door opens, the lights switch on, and in walks Laura Hunt, very much alive! To tell any more would rob the reader of the sheer enjoyment of watching this stylish film noir unfold on screen. Everything clicks in Laura, from the superbly bitchy peformance of Clifton Webb (a veteran Broadway star who became an overnight movie favorite with this film) to the haunting musical score by David Raskin. Long available only in the 85-minute TV version Laura has since been restored to its original 88-minute running time. Read More »

Otto Preminger – Bunny Lake Is Missing (1965)

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Plot sysnopsis from AMG:

Based on the mystery novel by Marryam Modell (using the pseudonym Evelyn Piper), Bunny Lake Is Missing is a bizarre study in motherhood, kindness, enigma, and insanity. Ann Lake (Carol Lynley), an American freshly relocated to England, wishes to drop off her daughter Bunny for the girl’s first day at a new nursery school. Oddly, Ann cannot locate any teachers or administrators, only the school’s disgruntled cook (Lucie Mannheim). She is forced to leave Bunny unsupervised in the building’s “first day” room, under the reassurance that the cook will be responsible for the child. When Ann returns in the afternoon, the cook has quit and Bunny Lake is missing. The school’s remaining employees vehemently deny ever seeing the child, and Ann desperately calls her older brother Stephen (Keir Dullea) for help. Ann was raised fatherless and never married; she and Bunny have lived under Stephen’s care and protection for the majority of both their lives. Stephen is enraged by the irresponsibility of the staff, but as Scotland Yard begins its investigation, it comes to light that he had never officially enrolled a child at the school. Read More »

Otto Preminger – The Human Factor (1979)

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Description: Otto Preminger’s final feature is a restrained but well crafted espionage thriller based on a novel by Graham Greene, adapted for the screen by Tom Stoppard. Preminger’s direction tends to lack verve and tension, removing what should be the human factor of a moral dilemma of loyalty. The cast includes Richard Attenborough, Derek Jacobi, John Gielgud, Ann Todd and Iman, but it’s Robert Morley who stands out from the crowd as a ruthless doctor. The convoluted and underdeveloped plot hinges on tacit Cold War approval for the apartheid regime in South Africa. Read More »

Otto Preminger – Rosebud (1975)

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Description: In a bold coup a Palestinian terrorist group capers the yacht Rosebud and kidnaps the 5 millionaires daughters on it. At first they demand film clips to be shown on major European TV stations. Undercover agent Martin is hired to hunt the terrorists down. Read More »

Otto Preminger – The Fan (1949)

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Description: Lord Windermere appears to all -including to his young wife Margaret – as the perfect husband. But their happy marriage is placed at risk when Lord Windermere starts spending his afternoons with an adventuress who is working her way through London’s high society, Mrs. Erlynne. Worse, Windermere gives her big sums of money. To crown it all he asks his wife to invite the detestable woman to her own birthday party. Upset and outraged, the puritan Lady Windermere decides to leave her husband and goes to Lord Robert Darlington, who has been courting her for some time. Unfortunately she leaves her fan -the one Robert offered her for her birthday – in Robert’s house… Written by Guy Bellinger (IMDB). Read More »