Jacques Levy – Oh! Calcutta! (1972)



The DVD was burned from the 1971 closed circuit production, apparently on Videotape. Therefore, it has a VHS appearance to it. By any American legal definition, this would fit under the R and not the X rating, since it is intended as art, and all sex acts are merely simulated, although there is a good deal of nudity. This is NOT Porn.

Oh! Calcutta! was a long-running avant-garde theatrical revue, created by British drama critic Kenneth Tynan. The show, consisting of various sketches on sex-related topics, debuted in Off-Broadway in 1969. It ran in London for over 2,400 performances, and in New York for over 1,600. The show sparked considerable controversy at the time, because it featured extended scenes of total nudity, both male and female. The title is taken from a painting by Clovis Trouille, itself a pun on “O quel cul t’as!”, French for “What an ass you have!”. Continue reading

Lasse Hallström – ABBA: The Movie [+Extras] (1977)


Movie detailing ABBA’s mega-successful tour of Australia during mid-1977. While it mostly contains back-stage footage and as well as ABBA’s famous songssuch as Dancing Queen, Tiger, Name Of The Game and Eagle among others sung filmed during their concerts in Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Adelaide, it has the sub-plot of young country and western radio disc-jockey, Ashley, whose boss orders him to have a deep interview with ABBA and the problems he has trying to reach them as he forgets his press pass and ABBA’s main bodyguard, (Tom Oliver) is determined to stop him… Written by Lee Horton Continue reading

Michael Lindsay – Let It Be (1970)


A documentary showing both how the Beatles made music together, and how they split up. Hundreds of hours of raw footage was condensed into the final product. The rooftop performance ending the film remains a rock-n-roll archetype.

Extended information

Thursday 2 – Wednesday 15 (January 1969) Recording sessions for The Beatles “White” album had proven to the group that they had entered a tense and difficult period. As their natural motivating force, Paul could think of only one solution: to have them “get back” to what had united them best before inconceivable fame and fortune had clouded the issue – live performances. Continue reading

Jean Baudrillard – The Violence Of The Image (2004)

Jean Baudrillard thinking and talking about the violence of the image,aggression, oppression, transgression,regression, effects and causes of violence, violence of the virtual, 3d, virtual reality, transparency, psychological and imaginary.

An open Lecture given by Jean Baudrillard after his seminar for the students
at the European Graduate School, EGS Media and Communication Program
Studies Department, Saas-Fee, Switzerland, Europe, in 2004. Continue reading

Ron Athey and Lee Adams – Visions of Excess (2009)

“It’s basically terrorist porn.”
–Bruce LaBruce

“Visions of Excess was a non-stop, 12 hour voyage into the heart of darkness, a communion with the ragged spirit of Georges Bataille, exploring the philosophers key themes of death, eroticism and the forbidden. This DVD features documentation from Visions of Excess London. Easter Sunday, 2009. Commissioned by SPILL Festival.

“Curated by Ron Athey and Lee Adams, and hosted by David Hoyle the event featured live performances, installations, film screenings and DJs. This dvd features excerpts from work by Lee Adams, Ron Athey, Franko B, Gio Black Peter, Bruce La Bruce, Christophe Chemin, Peter Christopherson, Zackary Drucker, Flawless Sabrina, Dominic Johnson, Mouse, Kira O’Reilly, L.Gabrielle Penabaz, Lazlo Pearlman, SmaxXx, Suka Off, Samantha Sweeting, Julie Tolentino and Veenus Vortex.” Continue reading

Hans-Jürgen Syberberg – Hitler – ein Film aus Deutschland AKA Hitler: A Film from Germany (1978)


The third and longest part of Syberberg’s extraordinary trilogy on German culture, history and nationalism (the two earlier films were Ludwig – Requiem for a Virgin King and Karl May), best described as a high camp, heavy-duty analysis of both history and historical analysis itself. The chosen method is to single out, act out, alter, and finally comment on the lives of a handful of ‘awkward’ German historical figures, from Ludwig of Bavaria through fantasy author Karl May to Hitler, the ‘madman’. Behind aesthetic complexity lies a simple purpose: to show up the sort of historical contradictions solved by Marxists with bare economic models, and by others with suspect reference to the ‘greatness’ or ‘madness’ of the figures involved. Visually lyrical, the style is eclectic to the point of hysteria; and the tone oscillates between the operatic (Wagner figures large) and the colloquial (Hitler in conversation with his projectionist) without ever quite coming unstuck. Humour mixes with mythology and analysis in the attempt to reunite art, history and ideology. It’s a quite remarkable film, with a sense of metaphor equal to its intellectual courage. Continue reading