Peter Yates – The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973)


Throughout Peter Yates’ masterful The Friends of Eddie Coyle, crooks, thieves and the occasional police officer use terms of complacent endearment — friend, nice guy, good man — but the words never seem to carry any meaning. All of them tend to agree that Eddie Coyle (Robert Mitchum), a career criminal at 51, is a nice guy, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t willing to put him in the dirt if it makes their lives easier. Coyle can’t really blame them for it; he knows the way of the world.

As its title points out, Friends has a very marginal interest in Eddie himself. In his first scene, Coyle goes about telling a gun dealer (Steven Keats) about how some associates of other associates slammed his fingers after a deal went sour. A low-level hood since God-knows-when, Eddie speaks about the situation congenially before telling the dealer that he needs 30 guns. Coyle has been supplying guns to a pack of bank robbers, the head of which is played by Alex Rocco. The money he’s making is to support his wife and kids before he reports for a two-year stint in a New Hampshire prison; he doesn’t feel his family should be scraping by on welfare. Continue reading

Peter Yates – Krull [+Extras] (1983)



Why you MUST give Krull a second look….
Author: Nathan castle

‘Fantasy’, in the traditional ‘Dungeons & Dragons’ sense, in the movies is often seen by the general public as a warning sign (and often rightly so). On the surface, Krull does seem like standard fantasy cliche. Prince must rescue princess from monster. Not very promising so far, is it? Already starting to lose interest? YOU FOOLS! Consider these additional elements: An orchestral soundtrack by the mighty James Horner (Titanic), which is possibly the best score he has ever written, possibly even THE best score ever written; A brilliant mostly-British cast, including Liam Neeson, Robbie Coltrane, Tucker Jenkins 🙂 and a host of other distinguished actors; A script which is so corny that it cannot fail to be fantastic when delivered with such hammed-up enthusiasm by the actors; and finally a few brilliant touches such as the boyhood-dream-weapon the Glave – a giant mind-controlled shuriken. This film falls in to the same category as Flash Gordon which was released a few years before – epic, brit-centric, totally entertaining masterpieces of camp grandeur. Don’t write it off until you’ve seen it enough to appreciate its subtleties. Continue reading

Peter Yates – Breaking Away (1979)



Dennis Christopher stars as a recent high school graduate in Bloomington, Indiana, who is caught with his friends — Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern, Jackie Earle Haley — coasting between high school and deciding what to do with the rest of their lives. The four friends are snobbishly looked down upon by the college students of the town as “cutters,” since they were born in Bloomington and their parents worked in the local limestone quarries that built the university. Dennis Christopher’s character Dave wants to be a champion bicycle racer and he idolizes the Italian racing team — so much so that he speaks, thinks, and acts Italian, all to his father’s (Paul Dooley) forlorn exasperation. Dave falls for a college girl (Robyn Douglass), but is ashamed to admit he is a cutter and poses as an Italian exchange student to impress her. Dave is particularly excited when his heroes — the Italian racers — come to town for a race. But they are even more snobbish than the college students and rely on dirty tricks to keep Dave from winning a race against them. After that ordeal, Dave throws away his false identity and convinces his friends to enter the university’s “Little 500” bicycle race against the college students. This light-hearted and heartwarming tale was a surprising word-of-mouth success at the box-office and won several awards, including an Academy Award for “Best Screenplay.”
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