Lav Diaz – Hesus rebolusyonaryo AKA Hesus the Revolutionary (2002)

gnrimg0609hesusbig Lav Diaz   Hesus rebolusyonaryo AKA Hesus the Revolutionary (2002)

logoimdbb Lav Diaz   Hesus rebolusyonaryo AKA Hesus the Revolutionary (2002)

Quote:
A military junta has taken power on the Philippines. Their takeover is fought by Moslem separatists, communists and rival military. In the middle of the chaos there is Hesus Mariano: academic, musician, poet and sniper. Politically tinted science-fiction action drama with an attitude.

It’s the year 2011 and the Philippines has been taken over by a military junta; the leader, a General Racellos, wields tight control over the country’s single TV station, radio station and newspaper. Racellos’ power is being challenged by Muslim secessionists, by the Communist movement and by a rival military group. In the middle of this turmoil stands Hesus Mariano (a quietly volatile Mark Anthony Fernandez) – scholar, musician, sharpshooter, poet, warrior. Jesus the Revolutionary was made on a shoestring budget (around five million pesos / 75,000 euro) and shot in roughly twenty days, but the ideas teeming in it are enough to fill a half-dozen lesser films. Except for the deserted streets and spray-painted graffiti, you won’t see any evidence of progress, of advanced technology, any sign at all that it’s almost a decade into tomorrow; if anything, things appear to have gotten worse… which is probably precisely Diaz’s point. It’s an action flick with an attitude, a political satire with a philosophical bent, a science-fiction drama with a committed political stance. The film mixes the influences of George Orwell, Jose Rizal and video games, using the future as a prismatic lens to focus on the follies of the present. (NV) Continue reading

Mike De Leon – Bayaning Third World (2000)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Mike De Leon   Bayaning Third World (2000)bayaning3rdworldmikedel Mike De Leon   Bayaning Third World (2000)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Mike De Leon   Bayaning Third World (2000)

Two filmmakers were obsessed with doing a film about Jose Rizal, the Filipino national hero. Their effort to explain the mysteries in the hero’s life lead them to confront the past and its characters.

This odyssey towards the illusive truth show us their face encounters with Dona Lolay, Rizal’s mother; Paciano, the brother; Josephine Bracken, the controversial “dulce extranjera”; Narcisa, the understanding elder sister who holds the key to the retraction controversy; and Padre Balaguet, the jesuit who writes about Rizal’s final hours. Continue reading

Keith Sicat – Room 213 (2008)

room213poster Keith Sicat   Room 213 (2008)

logoimdbb Keith Sicat   Room 213 (2008)

The story follows the endangered relationship of an architect and his wife, a photographer. After being married for 10 years, they have lost all emotional connections with each other. However,they both still want to save their marriage so they resort to extreme measures to revive their attraction for one another and rekindle their dying passions. They experiment with other partners and what happens is a matter of exchanging partners that resorts into an explosive climax of uncontrolled carnal desires. Continue reading

Jack Hill – The Big Bird Cage (1972)

bigbirdcage Jack Hill   The Big Bird Cage (1972)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Jack Hill   The Big Bird Cage (1972)

review from :movies.com
THE BIG BIRD CAGE/ FACTS Director Jack Hill followed up his genre-defining women-in-prison film THE BIG DOLL HOUSE with this action-packed sequel, also starring Pam Grier and set in the Philippines. Grier plays Blossom, the machine gun-toting girlfriend of revolutionary leader Django (Sid Haig). His fellow revolutionaries want girlfriends too, so Django and Blossom make plans to liberate the nearby women’s prison, a grueling sugar mill work camp run by the high-strung Warden Zappa (Andy Centera). Slender babe Anitra Ford co-stars as Torry, a free-spirited nymphomaniac whose bedding of important political figures has landed her in the prison, and who together with Blossom makes plans for the big, explosion-packed breakout. Grier and Ford are both dynamite with their bad attitudes and skimpy prison attire, and there’s plenty of catfights–both in and out of the mud, and showers. Aside from some dated gay-stereotype humor involving the male guards of the camp, this is still pretty rock-solid entertainment, replete with suspense, sex, bloodsoaked veangance, and captivating outdoor cinematography by Phillip Sandalan. Hill and Grier would follow up this success with the blaxploitation classic COFFY the following year. *Cast* Pam Grier , Anitra Ford , Sid Haig , Vic Diaz , Carol Speed , Andy Centenera Continue reading

Brillante Mendoza – Kinatay AKA The Execution of P (2009)

2vv26br Brillante Mendoza   Kinatay AKA The Execution of P (2009)

logoimdbb Brillante Mendoza   Kinatay AKA The Execution of P (2009)

“Daniel Kasman” wrote:
Dedicate a movie to one thing, respect the singular attention of the camera, and a film should be rich enough to overcome just about anything. Brillante Mendoza gives almost half of his film Kinatay to the nocturnal drive of a group of policemen out of Manila to its suburbs, and another half hour of night awaits them at their destination, a police black site. This rich vision of so much gloom, dim suspension, no action, no spectacle, no drama is a beautiful thing, something out of an avant-garde film dedicated to textures, subtle shifts in color, and spatial uncertainty of a sunless world. There is a story of course, of a young police trainee just married (that very day!) taken along on an off -he-books mission to torture a drug addicted stripper, and for a long time Mendoza plays the story like Haneke’s Funny Games (or a Park film), building up the audience’s desire for his hero to act violently, here to lash out at his sadistic superiors. And some of Kinatay is that tasteless, with its handholding music (riffing off of Kubrick’s synth scores for A Clockwork Orange and Full Metal Jacket) and artless, didactic cutaways That Explain Motivation by showing the cops’ horrific acts, the home that must be thought of. Continue reading

Elwood Perez – Silip aka Daughters of Eve (1985)

 Elwood Perez   Silip aka Daughters of Eve (1985)

logoimdbb Elwood Perez   Silip aka Daughters of Eve (1985)

Synopsis:
A wild, shocking and controversial title from the Philippines, guaranteed to have your jaw dropping.
In the tradition of Japanese “Pink” cinema comes this shocking, violent and sex filled movie that caused an outrage when it was screened at the Chicago Film Festival. The film stars former Miss Philippines, the stunning Maria Isabel Lopez, in her most revealing role ever. It‘s an eye-opening example of raw and savage filmmaking from one of its country’s most innovative directors. Set in the beautiful and remote countryside of Ilongo, the story tells of three young women and their struggle to come to terms with their own sexuality against a background of religious repression and male brutality. Continue reading

Lamberto V. Avellana – Badjao AKA Badjao, the Sea Gypsies (1957)

q72j Lamberto V. Avellana   Badjao AKA Badjao, the Sea Gypsies (1957)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Lamberto V. Avellana   Badjao AKA Badjao, the Sea Gypsies (1957)

Plot:
An classic film by film studio LVN, largely because of shining performances by Rosa Rosal and Tony Santos. It won the award for best direction (Lamberto V. Avellana, National Artist for Theater and Film in 1976), best story (Rolf Bayer), best editing (Gregorio Carballo), and best cinematography (Mike Accion) at the 1957 Southeast Asia Film Festival held in Tokyo.
A story about the Badjaos and the Tausogs, rival tribes for centuries. The Badjaos, a group of sea gypsies, ply the sea for food and for pearls.
Hassan (Tony Santos), a son of the Badjao chief falls in love and marries Bala Amai (Rosa Rosal) who is a niece of Datu Tahil (Jose de Cordova), head of the land-dwelling Tausogs. At the urging of Bala Amai, Hassan decides to leave his tribe and join the Tausogs.
Eventually, Datu Tahil learns of Hassan’s expertise in finding rare pearls in the sea, thus exploiting him for his own selfish interests. Hassan and Bala Amai resist him, feeling that their self-respect have been trampled on. They decide to go back to the Badjaos and lead a more humble, but nevertheless peaceful life. the Badjaos accept them with all their hearts. Continue reading

pixel Lamberto V. Avellana   Badjao AKA Badjao, the Sea Gypsies (1957)