Stephen Segaller – Jung on film (1957)

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Here a short description:
This compelling film represents a rare record of an original genius. In Jung on Film, the pioneering psychologist tells us about his collaboration with Sigmund Freud, about the insights he gained from listening to his patients’ dreams, and about the fascinating turns his own life has taken. Dr. Richard I. Evans, a Presidential Medal of Freedom nominee, interviews Jung, giving us a unique understanding of Jung’s many complex theories, while depicting Jung as a sensitive and highly personable human being. Continue reading

Alexander Kluge – Jeder Zirkus hat ein Ende (2018)

Alexander Kluge: Jeder Zirkus hat ein Ende
10vor11 Kulturmagazin, 25./26.6.18, RTL

Die 1509. und zugleich letzte Ausgabe des Kulturmagazins 10 VOR 11. Zum Abschied mit Überlänge. Mit Hannelore Hoger, Thomas Gottschalk, Friedrich Kittler, Dirk Baecker, Andrea Komlosy, Jürgen Kocka, Olli Schulz, Helge Schneider, Michel Serres, Niklas Luhmann, Heiner Müller, Hans-Thomas Janka, Andrea Kunder, David Gross (Nobelpreisträger), Rainer Weiss (Nobelpreisträger), Karin Mölling, Sir Henry, Sophie Rois, Präsident Trump und vielen anderen Gästen. Mit viel Musik, Information, Dialog, Bildern und Zusammenarbeit mit Partnern. Von Philosophie über Kunst und Wissenschaft bis zur “Abrüstung vom Sinnzwang”. So nah sind sich Helge Schneider und Michel Serres sonst nirgends gekommen. Continue reading

Neten Chokling – Milarepa (2006)

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Quote:
The Tibetan film Milarepa, produced in 2006 is set in the magnificent Spiti Valley high in the Himalayas in the Zanskar region close to the border between India and Tibet. Directed by Neten Choklin, a Lama from Western Bhutan who has previously worked with Khyentse Norbu on the films such as The Cup and Travellers and Magicians, the film is the first part about the adventurous formative years of the legendary buddhist mystic, Milarepa (1052-1135) who is one of the most widely known Tibetan Saints, but whom set out for vengeance and retribution.
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Pierre-André Boutang – L’abécédaire de Gilles Deleuze AKA Gilles Deleuze from A to Z (1996)

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Quote:
Although Gilles Deleuze never wanted a film to be made about him, he agreed to Claire Parnet’s proposal to film a series of conversations in which each letter of the alphabet would evoke a word: From A (as in Animal) to Z (as in Zigzag). These DVDs, elegantly translated and subtitled in English, make these conversations available for English-speaking audiences? for the first time.

In dialogue with Parnet (a journalist and former student of Deleuze), the philosopher exhibited the modest and thrilling transparency that his seminal works (such as Anti-Oedipus and A Thousand Plateaus) reveal. The sessions were taped when Deleuze was already terminally ill; he and Parnet agreed that the film would not be shown publicly until after his death. The awareness of mortality floats through the dialogues, making them not just intellectually stimulating but also emotionally engaging. Because Parnet knew Deleuze so well, she was able to draw him out–as no one else had–to what might be the 1001st plateau: a place of brilliance, rigor, and charm. Continue reading

Guy Debord – In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni AKA We Spin Around the Night Consumed by the Fire (1978)

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Quote:
Guy Debord’s final film, In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni (1978) (a Latin palindrome meaning ‘We go round and round in the night and are consumed by fire’), is structured as a dual reflection on the misery of (then) contemporary cinema, and the memory of those revolutionary moments that might have led to another cinema. The central image of the film is the charge of the light brigade, from Michael Curtiz’s 1936 film of the name, which figures the adventure of the Situationists. This is not simply an image of heroic futility, but the image of the evanescent eruption of the Situationists into history. In his commentary Debord argues that the film is organized by two elemental themes: water, as the representation of the flowing time, and fire, as the representation of momentary brilliance, in which water always drowns out this ‘fire.’ While it would be quite possible to give this a quasi-mystical reading it is, in fact, deeply political. Continue reading

Shuji Terayama & Shuntaro Tanikawa – Video Letters 1982-1983 (1982)

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Shuji Terayama (December 10, 1935—May 4, 1983) was an avant-garde Japanese dramatist, writer, director, and photographer, noted for such films as Emperor Tomato Ketchup and Fruits of Passion.
In 1967, Terayama started an experimental cinema and gallery called ‘Universal Gravitation,’ which is in fact still in existence at Misawa as a resource center. The Terayama Shuji Memorial Hall, which has a large collection of his plays, novels, poetry, photography and a great number of his personal affects and relics from his theatre productions, can also be found in Misawa.
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Yong-Kyun Bae – Dharmaga tongjoguro kan kkadalgun AKA Why Has Bodhi-Dharma Left for the East?: A Zen Fable (1989)

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Synopsis:
Three people live in a remote Buddhist monastery near Mount Chonan: Hyegok, the old master; Yong Nan, a young man who has left his extended family in the city to seek enlightenment – Hyegok calls him Kibong!; and, an orphan lad Haejin, whom Hyegok has brought to the monastery to raise as a monk. The story is mostly Yong Nan’s, told in flashbacks: how he came to the monastery, his brief return to the city, his vacillation between the turbulence of the world and his hope to overcome passions and escape the idea of self. We also see Hyegok as a teacher, a protector, and a father figure, and we watch Haejin make his way as a curious and nearly self-sufficient child. Continue reading