Aleksandr Sokurov – Spasi i Sokhrani aka Search and Protect (1990)

hxb7 Aleksandr Sokurov   Spasi i Sokhrani aka Search and Protect (1990)

logoimdbb Aleksandr Sokurov   Spasi i Sokhrani aka Search and Protect (1990)

“Save and protect is a philosophical tragedy where the drama of love is just a manifestation of the tragic nature of human life. Man is just a blind stranger, wandering around from his birth to his death. The story of the film is closely connected with the parable of human bondage and laws of fate; it exists beyond historical time and any concrete nationality. The latter is emphasised by a daring artistic device — the heroine’s speech is a mixture of Russian and French words without translation.

Tatiana Smorodinskaya (from the annotation of film editor)
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Neten Chokling – Milarepa (2006)

 Neten Chokling   Milarepa (2006)

logoimdbb Neten Chokling   Milarepa (2006)

Quote:
The Tibetan film Milarepa, produced in 2006 is set in the magnificent Spiti Valley high in the Himalayas in the Zanskar region close to the border between India and Tibet. Directed by Neten Choklin, a Lama from Western Bhutan who has previously worked with Khyentse Norbu on the films such as The Cup and Travellers and Magicians, the film is the first part about the adventurous formative years of the legendary buddhist mystic, Milarepa (1052-1135) who is one of the most widely known Tibetan Saints, but whom set out for vengeance and retribution.
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Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Der Tod des Empedokles (1987)

c30c Danièle Huillet & Jean Marie Straub   Der Tod des Empedokles (1987)

thgc Danièle Huillet & Jean Marie Straub   Der Tod des Empedokles (1987)

synopsis

Noted modernist German filmmakers Daniele Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub are behind this evocative minimalist retelling of the tragic story of Empedocles, a Greek philosopher and statesman who lived in the fourth century BC. To prove himself a god and therefore, immortal, Empedocles hurled himself into the burning caldera of Mount Etna and survived. There are four slightly different versions of the film available.
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Noam Chomsky vs Michel Foucault – Human Nature: Justice versus Power [Excerpt] (1971)

v0zb Noam Chomsky vs Michel Foucault   Human Nature: Justice versus Power [Excerpt] (1971)

International Philosophers’ Project 1971

Interviewer: Fons Elders

Aired on Dutch television, hence the additional subs. Debate took place in the US according to this.

Quote:
In 1971, American linguist/social activist Noam Chomsky squared off against French philosopher Michel Foucault on Dutch television … the program was entitled ‘Human Nature: Justice Vs. Power’ and offered sharp contrasts between the more traditional view of ‘human nature’ and what would become a postmodernist perspective … Chomsky, following a rationalist lineage going back to at least Plato, believes that there is a foundational ‘nature’ and that its positive aspects (love, creativity, recognizing and embracing justice) must be realized, while Foucault remains skeptical of any such notion… for him, the issue is not so much whether ‘justice’ or ‘human nature’ ‘exists,’ but how they have historically (and currently) function in society … in regard to justice, he says (this is not included in the clips): “… the idea of justice in itself is an idea which in effect has been invented and put to work in different types of societies as an instrument of a certain political and economic power or as a weapon against that power…” The point of any political struggle, for Foucault, is to alter the ‘power relations’ in which we all find ourselves (youtube user hiperf289) Continue reading

François Truffaut – L’Enfant Sauvage aka The Wild Child (1970)

51tndgdamwl François Truffaut   LEnfant Sauvage aka The Wild Child (1970)

thgc François Truffaut   LEnfant Sauvage aka The Wild Child (1970)

Quote:

A movie like this can be viewed in two main ways: a human example of a scientific study (with on screen replications of the study, and a moral conclusion); or a lesson in learning for the participants (the wild child will learn how to spell his adopted name; his teacher — and we the audience — will learn how to feel!). Truffaut kind of merges both into something of unique value. It feels a little removed, and it becomes clear that that’s to prevent sentimentality. It’s unsentimental, but Truffaut is a quiet master; as is the case with David Lynch’s “The Elephant Man,” his auteur sensibilities shine through the story so that it fits in neatly with his catalogue — here we have another film with a naked boy’s bum, and young children being goofy and walking in packs. What the film is is an intense magnification of the troubles of child-rearing, emphasized twofold by Truffaut’s role in the film: he is the “mother” giving birth to the film; and he is the father raising this “wild child” within the film; good-natured, but without the inherent understanding of the boy that his housekeeper has (and without the inherent understanding Truffaut the director has of cinema). Continue reading

Daryush Shokof – Seven Servants (1996)

sevenservants1996248274 Daryush Shokof   Seven Servants (1996)

logoimdbb Daryush Shokof   Seven Servants (1996)

synopsis

A very strange dream about a wealthy man preparing for death inspired director Daryush Shokof to make this off-beat and highly esoteric art film. Archie (Anthony Quinn) receives inner peace by being touched by people of four different racial groups. The film shows the five of them conducting daily activities as Quinn endures having their fingers in his nose and ears constantly for 10 days. Archie invites two old friends of his to be present at his death and reveals his secret for inner peace to them. The man goes off in a huff, but the woman stays around and finds her own enjoyment in the situation. Continue reading

Fred Haines – Steppenwolf (1974)

 Fred Haines   Steppenwolf (1974)

logoimdbb Fred Haines   Steppenwolf (1974)

Plot Synopsis: In the bourgeois circles of Europe after the Great War, can anything save the modern man? Harry Haller, a solitary intellectual, has all his life feared his dual nature of being human and being a beast. He’s decided to die on his 50th birthday, which is soon. He’s rescued from his solipsism by the mysterious Hermine, who takes him dancing, introduces him to jazz and to the beautiful and whimsical Maria, and guides him into the hallucinations of the Magic Theater, which seem to take him into Hell. Can humor, sin, and derision lead to salvation? Continue reading

pixel Fred Haines   Steppenwolf (1974)