Poland

Kazimierz Kutz – Nikt nie wola aka Nobody’s calling. (1960)

In 1960 Kazimierz Kutz’ second film NIKT NIE WOLA / NOBODY’S CALLING, based on a Jozef Hen novel that was never published in Poland, described the fate of Poles on the Eastern Front. Kutz used the film to explore new formal solutions, collaborating closely with cinematographer Jerzy Wojcik to reveal the psychological landscape of a pair of lovers who are strongly affected by wartime events. The camera recorded the couple’s inner experiences, contrasting their muted intimacy against the surrounding scenery of a ruined town. The film did not win over critics at the time of its release. It was not until later that critics recognized Kutz’s effort to experiment with aesthetics in a manner akin to that pursued by filmmakers of the new wave. NOBODY’S CALLING came to be compared with Michelangelo Antonioni’s THE ADVENTURE, which was produced around the same time. Read More »

Krzysztof Gradowski – Akademia pana Kleksa AKA Mr Blot’s Academy (1984)

Story:
A young boy is sent to a boarding school run by an eccentric scientist/magician. He befriends a talking bird named Matt and is told how it lost its human form, Matt was once a boy prince. Touched by the story, our young hero vows to help his feathered friend regain his true identity. The fairytale is based on the eternal conflict between Good and Evil. Good symbolised by Mr Blot means benevolence, understanding of different people and nature. Evil symbolised by Alois Bubble means egotism and thirst for power. But above all Mr Blot’s Academy is always full of fun and humour. Read More »

Wojciech Has – Jak byc kochana AKA How to Be Loved (1963)

Quote:
A drama about unfulfilled love (screenplay by Kazimierz Brandys based on his own short story). The film is for the most part the reminiscence of a radio actress named Felicja, who thinks back to the World War II occupation of Poland by Germany, when she hid a man (Wiktor) sought by the Gestapo in her apartment for a prolonged period. In order to remove suspicion from herself, she began to appear on stage, which rendered her a collaborator in the eyes of her peers from the acting community. Felicja made this sacrifice for Wiktor because she loved him and in spite of her love being unreturned. On the other hand, Wiktor perceives her sacrifice as a burden though Felicja does not notice this. Read More »

Krzysztof Gradowski – Pan Kleks w kosmosie AKA Mr. Blob in the Universe (1988) (HD)

Mr Ambrosio Inkblot created an Academy where he teaches 24 boys – whose names always start with the letter ‘A’. The building of academy is situated at Chocolate street and is surrounded by huge forest with the wall featuring gates to other fairy-tales. Mr Inkblot teaches the boys with the help of a mysterious starling bird – Matthew – who used to be a boy. But Kleks’ Academy is not a typical school – Mr Inkblot (played by Piotr Fronczewski) interprets dreams, his students throw ink during lessons and talk to heroes of other fairy-tales. Read More »

Andrzej Wajda – Krajobraz po bitwie AKA Landscape After Battle (1970)

Quote:
Andrzej Wajda’s Krajobraz po bitwie / Landscape After the Battle was a ground-breaking film discussing the personal stories of the inmates of a WW-II camp. The film also draws inspiration from one of Poland’s most iconic paintings.

The screenplay was mainly based on Tadeusz Borowski’s story, Bitwa pod Grunwaldem / The Battle for Grunwald, as well as, to a lesser extent, on a few other stories by the author. The authors of the script were – Andrzej Brzozowski, the co-writer of, among others, Pasażerka by Andrzej Munk and a known film documentarian, as well as Andrzej Wajda. Read More »

Pawel Lozinski – 100 lat w kinie AKA 100 Years of Polish Cinema [BFI Century of Cinema] (1995)

Quote:
The British Film Institute commissioned Krzysztof Kieslowski to make a documentary celebrating the centenary of cinema, and the latter passed the task onto his assistant at the time, Pawel Lozinski. “He didn’t want to deprive young Polish film makers of the artistic and financial opportunity,” says Lozinski. Kieslowski came up with the main concept, which was to give voice to the patrons themselves, the viewers, who perceive films as a part of their own lives. Lozinski brings back scenes from old Polish films and observes the animated faces of audiences as they are walking down memory lane. Read More »

Andrzej Wajda – Wesele AKA The Wedding (1973)

Quote:
It’s 1900, and for the last 130 years Poland has been wiped off the map of Europe; it’s still occupied by three invaders: Russia, Austria and Prussia. In a village near Cracow, a wedding takes place between a poet from the city and a country girl. The intelligentsia celebrates alongside the peasantry, but this is the full extent of any “agreement” between these two social classes, and the wedding guests are made aware of it by visiting apparitions. The chance for a national uprising is duly lost. Read More »