Poland

Krzysztof Kieslowski – Bez konca AKA No End (1985)

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Set during Martial Law in Poland and centers on the young widow of an attorney who defended activists during political trials. The woman finds herself unable to deal with her husband’s death. The spirit of the departed intervenes in her life and the widow constantly feels this presence. Her longing for her deceased husband ultimately leads her to commit suicide. The storyline of the heroine’s personal experiences is intertwined with that centering on the political trial of a young worker. In the film, Kieślowski offers a series of reflections on the political stance of society and the professional ethics of lawyers. Read More »

Krzysztof Kieslowski – Blizna AKA The Scar (1976)

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Films made under the state socialist regimes of Eastern Europe in the mid-twentieth century tend to fall roughly into two categories: the rigidly institutional and the scathingly anti-establishment. These films either serve to trumpet the cause of Communism or else find ways to avoid or subvert its conventions. The early films of Krzysztof Kieslowski present a slightly different alternative. On the one hand, these films duck the scrutiny of government censors with minute, incisive portraits of the system’s failings; but on the other, they tend to humanize and complicate the causes of these failings. Rather than make the system seem a corrupt, faceless entity, Kieslowski’s early films present a collection of individuals whose personal problems and shortcomings compose this system and thereby bring about its failure. Read More »

Krzysztof Kieslowski – Amator AKA Camera Buff (1979)

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It all starts when Filip Mosz (Jerzy Stuhr) buys a little 8mm movie camera to film his new-born baby. Like a true enthusiast, Filip enters into the spirit of his new hobby, filming everything that moves and working on the material on a small editing suite. When he is commissioned by his boss to film a reception being held to commemorate the company’s 25th anniversary, he becomes aware of the pressures of outside expectations and even censorship. The film however gets entered into an amateur film festival and wins third prize (second prize really since none were judged good enough to win first prize!) and he soon finds himself caught up in the world of TV and film-making, helped by an attractive film producer. Read More »

Andrzej Wajda – Czlowiek z marmuru AKA Man of Marble (1977)

Synopsis:
In 1976, a young woman in Krakow is making her diploma film, looking behind the scenes at the life of a 1950s bricklayer, Birkut, who was briefly a proletariat hero, at how that heroism was created, and what became of him. She gets hold of outtakes and censored footage and interviews the man’s friends, ex-wife, and the filmmaker who made him a hero. A portrait of Birkut emerges: he believed in the workers’ revolution, in building housing for all, and his very virtues were his undoing. Her hard-driving style and the content of the film unnerve her supervisor, who kills the project with the excuse she’s over budget. Is there any way she can push the film to completion? Read More »

Stanislaw Kokesz – Gubernator (1965)

Mad scientist Professor Fogg invites an unsuspecting friend into his futuristic mansion. He begins to tell him about plans to control Earth with the help of invaders from another planet. Read More »

Lukasz Ronduda & Maciej Sobieszczanski – Performer AKA The Performer (2015)

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A dynamic and full of punk energy story based on life of one of the most original and interesting contemporary artist, the performer, Oskar Dawicki (playing himself). The main theme of his art is the search for an answer to the question of whether. Oskar Dawicki exists at all. The trade mark of his performances is his blue shining jacket. Read More »

Lech Majewski – Blood of a Poet AKA Glass Lips (2007)

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This dialog-free film, originally presented as 33 short films, is an experimental, bizarre set of meditations and flashbacks of the grotesque. Read More »