Raoul Ruiz

Raoul Ruiz – Combat d’amour en songe AKA Love Torn in Dream (2000)

Quote:
Raul Ruiz’s Love Torn in a Dream is introduced with a fake newsreel, taking place in postwar France, in which the cast of the film meet with the producer, who explains the film’s complex weave of nine narratives. A diagram in which each story is represented by a letter of the alphabet explicates the intertwining of the nine tales. As the producer explains each actor’s role, the film begins. The stories, rooted in folklore, bump up against each other as the film leaps back in forth in time. They involve a jewel stolen from a painting, a mirror that “steals” what it reflects, a seminary student who dresses as a priest to hear the nuns’ confessions, brothers who combat each other in their search for a group of rings, a man whose everyday life is predicted by a website 24 hours in advance, a Catholic who finds out he’s really Jewish, and a treasure map that leads to a pirate’s chest. Each of the main cast members plays multiple roles. Ruiz veterans Melvil Poupaud and Elsa Zylberstein play the lead roles, while Lambert Wilson, Christian Vadim, Diogo Dória, José Meireles, and Rogério Samora play supporting roles. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – The Golden Boat (1990)

Inspired in form by American police TV shows and soap operas, The Golden Boat is a madcap, surreal dash through the streets of New York city, telling the mysterious and often hilarious story of an aged street-person named Austin, a comically compulsive assassin, as he joins up with a young rock critic and philosophy student named Israel Williams. In the course of their adventures, Austin pursues his object of desire – a Mexican soap opera star – and along the way engages a host of TV characters and bit players, whose repartee range from gangsterish insults to the question of God’s existence. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Trois vies et une seule mort AKA Three Lives and Only One Death [+Extras] (1996)

Quote:
A cleverly composed, prefiguring episode in Three Lives and Only One Death shows Mateo Strano (Marcello Mastroianni) in simultaneous, tripartite images (in a similar vein as Alain Resnais’ Last Year at Marienbad and Lina Wertmüller’s Love and Anarchy) through mirrors and split-screening as he continues to awkwardly fidget with his necktie even after a secondary point-of-view shot indicates that he has already placed his hands on the dinner table while waiting for his wife, Maria (Marisa Paredes) to return to the room. Read More »

Luis Ospina & Raoul Ruiz – Capítulo 66 (1994)

Quote:
A wild short made as part of a filmmaking workshop that Raúl Ruiz ran in Bogotá in October 1993. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz & Valeria Sarmiento – El Tango del Viudo y Su Espejo Deformante AKA The Tango of the Widower and Its Distorting Mirror (2020)

Description
The story of a man whose wife has committed suicide and appears to him as a ghost, following him everywhere and changing his personality. Unfinished in 1967 and restored for a 2020 premiere. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Het dak van de Walvis AKA On Top of the Whale (1982) (HD)

Quote:
A parody of anthropology, linguistics, and cultural imperialism. The film follows an unlikely team of linguists into the wilds of an ersatz Patagonia to study the last speakers of a dying language. That language apparently consists of a single word, which therefore means everything. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – La Recta Provincia (2007)

Synopsis:
Once upon a time there was a man. He lived with his mother, and worked as the caretaker of a large country house in Chile. One day the man found a bone in the garden. The bone had holes in it – it was a flute. The man took the flute and began to play it. The music turned into a song, and the voice singing the song begged the man to look for the other bones of a body scattered here and there. So the man and his mother set off following every path – that of God and those of the devil -, looking for the bones so that they could put the skeleton of the Christian man back together again and give him a Christian burial. And they saw what they saw, and lived what they lived. Many a story. And although they never told their tale to anyone, others told it for them. Read More »