Romance

Mitchell Leisen – Hold Back the Dawn (1941)

Quote:
This superior melodrama with a darkly comic tinge came out at a time when Mitchell Leisen’s career was running hot after a series of successes including films like Easy Living, Midnight, and Remember the Night. It was also the last film Billy Wilder (in partnership with Charles Brackett) was content with just writing the screenplay for. He was supposedly so annoyed by the way Leisen took liberties with his script that he resolved never to cede directorial control again. Read More »

Terence Young – Mayerling (1968)

Synopsis:
It’s the late nineteenth century Austria. The Emperor Franz-Joseph and his son, the Crown Prince, Archduke Rudolf, have never seen eye to eye. While the Emperor retains the traditions of the empire in the rapidly changing world keeping it a police state, Rudolf is liberal, wanting to see the people have a say in what happens in their lives. Rudolf even rejected the Emperor’s choice of a Spanish wife for him, he instead choosing Belgian Stephanie as his wife, that marriage which he himself never saw and will never see as anything more than a political alliance, Stephanie who he considers a shrew. Read More »

Mabel Cheung – Ba liang jin AKA Eight Taels of Gold (1989)

Quote:
Mabel Cheung may be one of the lesser known names of the early 80s Hong Kong New-Wave – directors such as Tsui Hark and Ann Hui gaining a greater attention worldwide – yet she has an indelible auteur’s stamp that ensure her greater works will stand the test of time. The subtle strokes which she paints works such as the sublime ‘An Autumn’s Tale’ are testament to the efficacy of her understated, yet consistently resonant style. ‘Eight Taels Of Gold’ is the opportunity to see the auteur behind the lens directing one of Hong Kong’s most beloved stars, Sammo Hung, as he participates in a rare non-action role. Read More »

Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger – Gone to Earth (1950)

Screen legend Jennifer Jones (Portrait of Jennie) stars as the young, beguiling Hazel Woodus in 1897 Shropshire, England. More than the people around her, she loves and understands the wild animals of the countryside, especially her pet fox. Whenever she has problems, she turns to the book of spells and charms left to her by her gypsy mother. When dashing local squire Jack Reddin (David Farrar, Hour of Glory) begins to pursue Hazel—despite her marriage to Baptist minister Edward Marston (Cyril Cusack, Fahrenheit 451)—a struggle for her body and soul ensues. Read More »

Chucho E. Quintero – Los días particulares AKA These Peculiar Days (2019)

Synopsis:
Eight friends travel to a cabin in the woods to celebrate their high school graduation. Read More »

James Foley – Reckless (1984)

ElmoOxygen writes:
James Foley’s (At Close Range, Glengarry Glen Ross) first film, as well as Aidan Quinn’s, this flashy, empty, very 80’s movie features Quinn and Daryl Hannah in a midwestern, steel-mill version of Romeo and Juliet. Shot by Fassbinder, Scorsese and Redford’s DP, Michael Ballhaus, and written by Chris Columbus (Gremlins, The Goonies, director of Home Alone 1 and 2, the first two Harry Potter films, and the classic, Bicentennial Man), it is filled to the brim with hideous, yet hilarious dialogue, mostly via setting up “tough guy” Aidan Quinn and his motorcycle antics, who, no matter how old he was at the time, always looks 35, betraying the notion that he’s a high school student. Read More »

Roman Polanski – Tess (1979)

Synopsis:
In Roman Polanski’s take on “Tess of the D’Urbervilles,” impressionable young Tess (Nastassja Kinski) is sent by her alcoholic father to visit her rich relatives and apply for a job. She’s taken in and immediately seduced by her cousin, Alec (Leigh Lawson), who leaves her pregnant. She keeps it to herself and, after the child dies, begins a relationship with a respectable farmer, Angel (Peter Firth). They marry, but when Angel learns of her speckled past, he’s not sure he can live with it. Read More »