Thomas Cailley – Les combattants aka Love at First Fight (2014)

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It’s summer and Arnaud begins work for the family business, building garden sheds with his brother. Meeting under unusual circumstances, he becomes fascinated with the surly Madeleine.
Obsessed by survival and gripped by prophecies of doom, Madeleine determines to join an elite commando unit. Arnaud follows. As they begin at an army training camp, their bodies and emotions are put to the test.
An improbable mix of teen-movie, rom-com, and pre-apocalypse film, stretching the limits of each genre. Continue reading

Mia Hansen-Løve – Eden (2014)

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The film follows the rise and fall of Paul, a DJ who pioneered the French touch – a type of electronic dance music that became widely popular in the 1990s.

At a time where raves dominate the era, Paul is drawn to the sounds of Chicago’s garage house. It’s not long before he forms a DJ duo called Cheers and his friends form the group Daft Punk. Together they fall headfirst into the world of drugs, sex, and music. Continue reading

Peter Greenaway – The Pillow Book (1996)

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Review
Nagiko’s father was a calligrapher, and when she was a little girl he would write his birthday greetings on her face. Her mother would read aloud from a 1,000-year-old manuscript, (italics) The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, (unital) which dealt among other things with the arts of love. Because children invest their birthdays with enormous importance, it’s no wonder that when Nagiko grows up she finds a powerful link between calligraphy, human flesh, poetry, and sexuality.

Peter Greenaway, born in Australia, long working in England, is not so far from Nagiko himself. His films also work by combining images, words, quotations and sexual situations. He uses the screen as Nagiko uses flesh, finding an erotic charge not just in the words, but in the surface they are written on, His new film “The Pillow Book,” starring Vivian Wu (from “The Last Emperor”), is a seductive and elegant story that combines a millennium of Japanese art and fetishes with the story of a neurotic modern woman who tells a lover: “Treat me like the pages of a book.” Early in Nagiko’s life, she sees something she was not intended to see: Her father’s publisher (Yoshi Oida), forcing her father (Ken Ogata) to have sex as the price of getting a book published. On another occasion, when she is 6 or 7, she is introduced to the publisher’s 10-year-old nephew, and told this will be her future husband. These events set up fundamental tensions in her life, and as an adult, unhappily married to the publisher’s nephew, she begins keeping her own pillow book. The nephew (Ken Mitsuishi) is a shallow dolt, who finds her book and in a jealous rage burns her papers and then their house. Continue reading

Ren Peng – The Destiny (2014)

Plot:
The story takes place in 1937 in the southern town, a young woman married into Yinjialin rain lotus in the day, never met her husband joined the fleeing forced marriages MingXuan Japanese team, taking into account the family face, Ming Hao Yinjialin decided to let his brother instead of his brother weddings married , temporarily to defuse the crisis, but in the hearts of the people can not be together planted the seeds of love.
Over time, the war to the South. In the traditional immoral attack, rain Lin and Ming Hao, like love, like this piece of land was the ruthless destruction. Mingxuan killed returned a town news, grief hearts of two people and took a step closer.
But the fate of the family’s love and innocence in the face of war seemed fragile. Merciless fire enveloped the town, wedding eve, Minghao hesitate to join the fight to the death squads …… not the aggressor in the war-torn environment, weak rain stick on the beautiful lotus town, but also true to his love Continue reading

Joseph Losey – The Go-Between (1970)

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Quote:
This 1971 adaptation of L.P. Hartley’s novel was the third and final collaboration between Joseph Losey and Harold Pinter, and is often seen as the least successful.

It is the story of a young boy, Leo (Dominic Guard), who spends a hot summer holiday with his friend Marcus’ (Richard Gibson) upper-class family at their country house, unwittingly becoming embroiled in a forbidden love affair between the daughter and a local farmer. The Go-Between mirrors several of the themes of Losey and Pinter’s previous projects, The Servant (1963) and Accident (1967). Dwelling on themes of class, loss of innocence and our relationship to the past, the novel is well suited to Losey’s cold, detached style and Pinter’s subtle, allusive language. Continue reading

Barry Jenkins – Medicine for Melancholy (2008)

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“Everything about being indie is tied to not being black,” says Micah (Wyatt Cenac), half of the accidental kind-of couple whose one-day romance is chronicled in “Medicine for Melancholy.” He is making an observation — and also registering a complaint — about the quasi-bohemian way of life he shares with Jo’ (Tracey Heggins), his temporary other half. It bothers Micah that their embrace of the folkways of urban hipsterism seems to require the suppression of their African-American identity.

But his words, which Jo’ doesn’t quite agree with, also suggest a degree of self-awareness, and self-questioning, on the part of Barry Jenkins, who wrote and directed this small, incisive film. Most recent movies about culturally savvy, affectless 20-somethings hooking up and being cool are very much tied to not being black. They are about diffident, underemployed white boys and the women who (sometimes inexplicably) go to bed with them. Continue reading