Roy Ward Baker – Dr Jekyll and Sister Hyde (1971)

Image Hosted by


In Victorian London, young Dr. Jekyll attempts to create an Elixir of Life using female hormones stolen from the glands of fresh corpses. But when Jekyll drinks the experimental potion himself, he is transformed into a beautiful woman with an unstoppable taste for mayhem. Can both fiends share a rampage of ghastly murder and perverse desire, or will the ultimate battle of the sexes rage within Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde?

Ralph Bates (Horror of Frankenstein, Lust for a Vampire) and Martine Beswick (Thunderball, One Million Years B.C.) star in this gender-bending twist on the classic tale that horror fans consider one of the most provocative shockers in Hammer history – presented here complete and uncut, with footage not seen in the original U.S. theatrical release. Continue reading

Roy Ward Baker – — And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973)


England 1795: the young Catherine just married Charles Fengriffen and moves into his castle. She becomes victim of an old curse that lays on the family. In her wedding night she’s raped by a ghost and gets pregnant.-imdb-

In 1795, in England, the young woman Catherine (Stephanie Beacham) moves to the house of her fiancé Charles Fengriffen (Ian Ogilvy) in the country to get married with him. When she arrives, she feels interest in the portraits of the Fengriffen family, particularly in the one of Charle’s grandfather Henry Fengriffen (Herbert Lom), which seems to have a sort of evil entity possessing it. While admiring Henry’s face, a severed hand attacks Catherine through the picture on the wall. Later, she gets married with Charles, beginning her journey of mystery, eerie apparitions, secrets and deaths, and having her days filled with fear and the nights with horrors in a cursed family.-imdb- Continue reading

Roy Ward Baker – A Night to Remember (1958)


Director Roy Ward Maker, and his producer, William MacQuitty, have done a sterling job in putting the tragic sinking of the Titanic in 1912 on the screen with an impressive, almost documentary flavour. With around 200 speaking roles in the film, few of the actors are given much chance to develop as characters. Even leading player Kenneth More, is merely part of a team. The ship itself is the star.

The story tells how the Titanic widely regarded as unsinkable, set out on her maiden voyage bound for the United States on the night of the 14th April, 1912, and how she struck an iceberg and sank – in less than three hours – with the loss of 1,302 drowned, and only 705 survivors.

The errors and confusion which played a part in the drama are brought out with no whitewashing. Technically director Roy Baker does a superb job under difficult circumstances, with special mention for the lifeboat scenes which were expertly done. Eric Ambler’s screenplay (from Walter Lord’s book) brings out how some people kept their heads, and others became cowards. Continue reading