Mikhail Lukachevsky – Urun kun AKA A White Day (2013)

 Mikhail Lukachevsky   Urun kun AKA A White Day (2013)

On a frozen dark night in remote Siberia, a group of strangers travel home together in a van. When the driver refuses to stop for an elder, a darkening shadow looms over what could possibly be the most tragic night of their lives. This dramatic and thrilling feature with its poetic pacing and exquisite cinematography is easily one of Lukachevskyi’s finest works.

Winner — Best Dramatic Feature — 15th International Film Festival of Indigenous Peoples ImagineNATIVE in Toronto Continue reading

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Ilmar Raag – Ya ne vernus AKA I Won’t Come Back (2014)

 Ilmar Raag   Ya ne vernus AKA I Wont Come Back (2014)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Ilmar Raag   Ya ne vernus AKA I Wont Come Back (2014)

A young woman who grew up in orphanage is longing to be loved, but does not have it in her to love others. Her teenage looks help her while falsely accused of committing a crime to hide in a orphanage without arousing any suspicion. There, she meets a 13 years old homeless person like herself, Kristina, and together they set out on a long journey to a small town in Kazakhstan, where Kristina’s grandmother lives… Continue reading

Mikhail Segal – Kino pro Alekseeva AKA A Film About Alekseev (2014)

 Mikhail Segal   Kino pro Alekseeva AKA A Film About Alekseev (2014)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Mikhail Segal   Kino pro Alekseeva AKA A Film About Alekseev (2014)

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Sometimes we know less about the past than about the future. Alekseev, a lonely old man, unexpectedly discovers that he has not lived the life he thought he had, and finds himself to be a completely different person. Continue reading

Natalya Meshchaninova – Kombinat ‘Nadezhda’ AKA The Hope Factory (2014)

hGTklZ Natalya Meshchaninova   Kombinat Nadezhda AKA The Hope Factory (2014)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Natalya Meshchaninova   Kombinat Nadezhda AKA The Hope Factory (2014)

Industrial city of Norilsk: factories, cold, chemical air. The only desire of young people living here is to leave, against all odds. A docu-style, emotionally-driven drama about a young girl desperately fighting for an escape which is so blurry, and for love which is so insecure.

Due to its vast industrial areas and enormous industrial output, the Russian city of Norilsk has become one of the most polluted places in the world. However, despite the persistent ecological crisis, the severe northern climate and harsh living conditions, life goes on there in its own extreme, as well as routine, way. But the will to live that such an existence fosters is actually the will, or rather the dream, to escape, especially for a young generation. A desperate, hardly possible dream that moves and traps its adherents, turning against them. Continue reading

Aleksandr Sokurov – Vostochnaya elegiya AKA Oriental Elegy (1996)

cover005 Aleksandr Sokurov – Vostochnaya elegiya AKA Oriental Elegy (1996)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Aleksandr Sokurov – Vostochnaya elegiya AKA Oriental Elegy (1996)

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Oriental Elegy (1996). Visually impressionistic, atmospherically dense, and narratively opaque, Oriental Elegy is the surreal journey of a displaced spirit (Aleksandr Sokurov) as he wanders in the interminable darkness through the temporal landscape of a quaint and isolated feudal-era fishing village. Guided by a series of faintly illuminated rooms, the wandering spirit comes upon ancient souls who take on physical forms as they recount their personal stories of daily existence, loss, and tragedy in the peasant community. Intrigued by his initial visit to a curiously distracted elderly woman, the spirit returns to her home in order to ask a fundamental question – “What is happiness?” – an existential query that is innocently answered with innate humility and accepted unknowingness. Through abstractly textured imagery and indelibly hypnotic dreamscapes, Sokurov composes a metaphoric, sensual, and evocative tone poem on a soul’s search for enlightenment and the essential survival of human consciousness. Continue reading

Aleksei German – Khrustalyov, mashinu! AKA Khrustalyov, My Car! (1998)

 Aleksei German   Khrustalyov, mashinu! AKA Khrustalyov, My Car! (1998)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Aleksei German   Khrustalyov, mashinu! AKA Khrustalyov, My Car! (1998)

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Winter is never-ending in Aleksei Guerman’s impenetrable film ”Khroustaliov, My Car!,” a nearly two-and-a-half hour absurdist nightmare of life in the Soviet Union during the final days of Stalin’s rule. Snow falls in almost every scene of this starkly grim, black-and-white movie, which follows the triumph, fall from grace and hasty rehabilitation of a hulking Red Army general and brain surgeon named Yuri Glinshi (Yuri Tsourilo). Processions of black government vehicles are forever materializing like ominous phantoms through the curtains of snow that drift over a dilapidated town decorated with gleaming white statues of the beady-eyed, mustached Soviet dictator. Continue reading

Timur Bekmambetov – Nochnoy Dozor AKA Night Watch (2004)

 Timur Bekmambetov   Nochnoy Dozor AKA Night Watch (2004)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Timur Bekmambetov   Nochnoy Dozor AKA Night Watch (2004)

Information

Little Shop of Horrors, Russian Style

By Oleg Liakhovich The Moscow News

On the heels of the XXVI Moscow International Film Festival came an event even more pompous and widely publicized – the premiere of a movie meant to spark a revival of Russia’s popular cinema while giving Hollywood a battle royale on its own terms

Night Watch (Nochnoy Dozor in original Russian) depicts the on-going struggle between the magical forces of good and evil in present-day Moscow. The movie was eagerly awaited by fans and became an object of an intense advertising campaign in all media. Its US $3mln budget – an incredible sum for a local movie – and plentiful special effects, also a novelty for Russian cinema with its established traditions of inexpensive quality dramas and solid adaptations of literary classics, were to make Night Watch Russia’s equivalent of an American summer blockbuster. The producers actually went as far as officially calling it “the first Russian blockbuster” long before it had the chance to appear on screen. Even Russia’s own Oscar winner and self-styled national sage director Nikita Mikhalkov, while admitting that the film “wasn’t his thing”, said that it was “cool” and called it Russia’s “answer to Quentin Tarantino”. Serious praise indeed – after all, only a dirty mind would suspect Mikhalkov of still being sore at old Quentin for “stealing” his Palme d’Or in Cannes back in 1994.
Lightsaber, Anyone? Continue reading

pixel Timur Bekmambetov   Nochnoy Dozor AKA Night Watch (2004)