Motoyoshi Oda – Gojira no gyakushu aka Gigantis the Fire Monster (1955)

j3d2vv Motoyoshi Oda   Gojira no gyakushu aka Gigantis the Fire Monster (1955)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Motoyoshi Oda   Gojira no gyakushu aka Gigantis the Fire Monster (1955)

Quote:
“…Two spotter pilots for a Japanese fish canning plant crash land on a deserted island where both Godzilla and
Anguirus are already engaged in mortal combat. During the fight the two titans plunge into the sea and
disappear leaving the two onlookers amazed at what they had both witnessed. Would anybody believe their
amazing tale?

The Japanese scientific community could take no chances. The two pilots were questioned thoroughly and
asked to identify the monsters from a pile of sketches of known prehistoric creatures. The scientist’s worst fears
would become reality. One of the creatures was indeed another Godzilla and the other an equally beast
Anguirus. Tokyo was destroyed by just one of these monsters. How could Japan defend itself against two…”
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Piotr Szulkin – O-bi, O-ba – Koniec cywilizacji AKA O-bi O-ba – The End Of Civilization (1985)

iz220q Piotr Szulkin   O bi, O ba   Koniec cywilizacji AKA O bi O ba   The End Of Civilization (1985)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Piotr Szulkin   O bi, O ba   Koniec cywilizacji AKA O bi O ba   The End Of Civilization (1985)

Synopsis:

In a murky, sometimes confusing tale about a future dystopia in which people are waiting — and waiting — for a rescue ship called the Ark, there are several good one-liners, but they are outnumbered by the puzzling riddles and symbolism that permeate the story. The flotsam and jetsam of humanity are huddled together in an underground labyrinth after civilization as we know it has been obliterated by the Bomb. The survivors are protected by a dome which a repairman notes is bound to crack before the Ark arrives because it was constructed under a one-year plan. The hero of the film searches for the origins of the myth about the Ark and along the way falls in love with a prostitute. It seems the world’s oldest profession has also survived the nuclear holocaust. Continue reading

Otto Brower – The Phantom Empire (1935)

 Otto Brower   The Phantom Empire (1935)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Otto Brower   The Phantom Empire (1935)

From IMDB:
When the ancient continent of Mu sank beneath the ocean, some of its inhabitant survived in caverns beneath the sea. Cowboy singer Gene Autry stumbles upon the civilization, now buried beneath his own Radio Ranch. The Muranians have developed technology and weaponry such as television and ray guns. Their rich supply of radium draws unscrupulous speculators from the surface. The peaceful civilization of the Muranians is corrupted by the greed from above, and it becomes Autry’s task to prevent all-out war, ideally without disrupting his regular radio show.
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Jack Smight – The Illustrated Man (1969)

PRVEcZ Jack Smight   The Illustrated Man (1969)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Jack Smight   The Illustrated Man (1969)

The Illustrated Man is a 1969 American science fiction film directed by Jack Smight and starring Rod Steiger. The film is based on three short stories from the 1951 collection The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury: “The Veldt”, “The Long Rain”, and “The Last Night of the World”.

The Illustrated Man comprises three science fiction short stories from Ray Bradbury’s collection of the same name. Howard B. Kreitsek wrote the screenplay that encompassed the stories “The Veldt”, “The Long Rain”, and “The Last Night of the World”, Jack Smight directed the film. Bradbury was not consulted for the adaptation.[1] The author sold story rights to the film in December 1967 for $85,000, but he did not sell the film rights. Since the collection included eighteen short stories, Smight chose three stories and used the carnival sideshow freak who appeared in the collection’s prologue and epilogue as the film’s primary narrative. As the freak, the director cast Rod Steiger, whom he had known since the 1950s. Continue reading

Richard Viktorov – Cherez ternii k zvyozdam AKA Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)

bdws Richard Viktorov   Cherez ternii k zvyozdam AKA Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)

thgc Richard Viktorov   Cherez ternii k zvyozdam AKA Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)

Quote:
To the Stars by Hard Ways was first released in 1985, and the print being screened at Fantasia is the newly restored version that was shorn of 20 minutes and re-edited by the director’s son Nikolai Viktorov in 2001. Once given the Mystery Science Theatre treatment in a truncated version known as Humanoid Woman, To the Stars by Hard Ways has gained a cult-classic status among Russian youths who were attuned to the film’s blend of pop social commentary and stunning visual alchemy. The latter is a result of a varied cinematic style which incorporates poetic touches of Tarkovskian influenced naturalism (“earthy, organic” set design), shifting colour patterns (between sepia, monochromatic blue and saturated nature imagery), and simple yet inventive in-camera special effects (slow motion, reverse, dissolves, mirror shots etc.). To the Stars by Hard Ways functions marvelously well on multiple levels — as a trippy science-fiction social critique of environmental neglect, as a campy treat of mod visuals and Star Trek-influenced human and alien characters, and as a retro Communist propaganda piece. Even with these at times radical shifts in tone, the film remains a genuinely moving existential space opera.
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pixel Richard Viktorov   Cherez ternii k zvyozdam AKA Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)