Sci-Fi

Jack Arnold – Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)

A strange prehistoric beast lurks in the depths of the Amazonian jungle. A group of scientists try to capture the animal and bring it back to civilization for study. Read More »

Vincent McEveety – The Strongest Man in the World (1975)

A school laboratory accident mixes one student’s vitamin cereal mix with Dexter Riley’s chemical experiment. When the kids decide to dispose of the mess to their neighbor’s cow, they learn that the cereal gave the cow the super-strength to give a massively vast supply of milk. When they try it out on themselves, they discover that the stuff gives any human superhuman strength for a few minutes. The school sees this as the thing needed to save their school from closure, as the Dean makes a deal with his relative who owns the company that makes the cereal for financial support, unaware that it was Dexter’s chemical which was solely responsible for the strength. When her competitor learn of this deal, he hires two criminals to stop it. Read More »

Jean-Daniel Pollet – Le maître du temps AKA The Master of Time (1970)

Quote:
An alien, master of the time from a distant star who travels centuries to centuries, explores our planet. He finds himself on a Brazilian beach with his magic ring. Read More »

Jóhann Jóhannsson – Last and First Men (2020)

Two billion years ahead of us, a future race of humans finds itself on the verge of extinction. Almost all that is left in the world are lone and surreal monuments, beaming their message into the wilderness.

Based on the cult science fiction novel of the same name by Olaf Stapledon, Jóhann Jóhannsson artfully combines music, film and narrative spoken by Hollywood star Tilda Swinton in his opus Magnum Last and First Men, a poetic meditation on memory and loss. Read More »

Vittorio Cottafavi – Operazione Vega (1962)

Quote:

A TV movie (aired on Rai on July 2, 1962) that seems to come from a remote galaxy. We are no longer used to anything like this. It is an alienating charm, consciously cooled to the extreme, stylized in its scenographic and luminous lines of relentless, literary cleanliness (where can we hear a word like “dripping” on TV today?), Without a shred of sentimentality.

In short, Bertolt Brecht on the small screen. The text is taken from a radio original by Friedrich Dürenmatt. Read More »

Sean S. Cunningham – Terminal Invasion (2002)

Terminal Invasion is a 2002 science fiction television film directed by Sean S. Cunningham and starring Bruce Campbell and Chase Masterson. The plot involves a group of aliens disguised as humans who take over an airport in preparation for an invasion of Earth. A female pilot and a convicted murderer fight back. Read More »

Noam Gonick – Hey, Happy! (2001)

Quote:
DJ Sabu’s overactive libido leads him into teenaged pregnancy. His mythic quest for two thousand boys ends with Happy, a paranoid UFO-ologist to whom aliens promise to appear (as his love child). Spanky is an evil hairdresser trying to foil Sabu’s mission, he is the self-proclaimed ‘biggest bitch in the world.’ The action unfolds at a series of raves on old garbage hill in an industrial Antonioni landscape peopled with characters right out of vintage John Waters. Read More »