Richard Viktorov – Cherez ternii k zvyozdam AKA Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)

bdws Richard Viktorov   Cherez ternii k zvyozdam AKA Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Richard Viktorov   Cherez ternii k zvyozdam AKA Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)

Quote:
To the Stars by Hard Ways was first released in 1985, and the print being screened at Fantasia is the newly restored version that was shorn of 20 minutes and re-edited by the director’s son Nikolai Viktorov in 2001. Once given the Mystery Science Theatre treatment in a truncated version known as Humanoid Woman, To the Stars by Hard Ways has gained a cult-classic status among Russian youths who were attuned to the film’s blend of pop social commentary and stunning visual alchemy. The latter is a result of a varied cinematic style which incorporates poetic touches of Tarkovskian influenced naturalism (“earthy, organic” set design), shifting colour patterns (between sepia, monochromatic blue and saturated nature imagery), and simple yet inventive in-camera special effects (slow motion, reverse, dissolves, mirror shots etc.). To the Stars by Hard Ways functions marvelously well on multiple levels — as a trippy science-fiction social critique of environmental neglect, as a campy treat of mod visuals and Star Trek-influenced human and alien characters, and as a retro Communist propaganda piece. Even with these at times radical shifts in tone, the film remains a genuinely moving existential space opera.
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Jonathan Glazer – Under the Skin (2013)

cvpj Jonathan Glazer   Under the Skin (2013)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Jonathan Glazer   Under the Skin (2013)

Quote:
Jonathan Glazer‘s film is a gorgeous piece of film-making that leaves the narrative heavy-lifting to the viewers as it eschews a traditional setup and instead relies on visuals to clue us in as the story progresses. Expect complaints similar to those hurled at Upstream Color, that the story is unclear or convoluted, but such accusations are as baseless here as they were with Shane Carruth’s film. The details may be elusive, but the steadily engrossing narrative is clear. Continue reading

Yakov Protazanov – Aelita (Аэлита) AKA Revolt of the Robots (1924)

aelitaposter1 Yakov Protazanov   Aelita (Аэлита) AKA Revolt of the Robots (1924)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Yakov Protazanov   Aelita (Аэлита) AKA Revolt of the Robots (1924)

Directed by Soviet filmmaker Yakov Protazanov made on Mezhrabpom-Rus film studio and released in 1924. It was based on Alexei Tolstoy’s novel of the same name.

AllMovie wrote:
The Marxist struggle reaches outer space in this fanciful Russian science fiction film from the silent period. Los (Nikolai Tsereteli) is an engineer who dreams of traveling to other worlds and imagines that a beautiful woman named Aelita (Yuliya Solntseva) lives on the planet Mars. Frustrated with the petty political conflicts that are a big part of life on Earth, Los builds a spaceship and travels to Mars, where he discovers that the lovely Aelita really does exist and is Queen of the Planet. However, the realities of political struggle do not escape him; it seems that the Martian proletariat are attempting to rise up and take power just as the Russian rank and file did, and Los once again finds himself standing between the ruling leadership and the workers attempting to take control of their own lives.
4/5
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pixel Yakov Protazanov   Aelita (Аэлита) AKA Revolt of the Robots (1924)