Sci-Fi

Don Sharp – Curse of the Fly (1965)

Remember that scientist that was trying to perfect a matter transportation machine but got fused with a fly when one of the little critters got into the transporter with him? Well, this story is about three of his descendents (a son, Henri Delambre, played by Brian Donlevy and two grandsons). Seems the son wants to continue and perfect the machine while his two sons want to get out of the scientist business and live “normal” lives. The oldest son, Martin, decides to take a wife (who just happens to have escaped from a mental hospital after her parents died). Martin’s father is not happy with this intrusion but finally gives in because he understands him son’s needs. They all try to be a happy family until humans used in botched experiments are discovered by the new bride and the police nearly discover the lab while looking for Martin’s wife. Everyone tries to get out of there via the transporter but things just don’t go according to plan … Read More »

Kurt Neumann – Kronos (1957)

Scientists investigate what appears to be a meteorite that crashes into the ocean. After a few days and nights of mysterious lights and noises, a giant machine comes out of the ocean. The machine is the creation of an alien race, that is trying to syphon energy from earth. A true classic, in that it is so different from anything in the time period. To this day, nothing else has come out like it. Read More »

Andrew Marton – Crack in the World (1965)

A scientist trying to better mankind nearly destroys the world as we know it in this sci-fi thriller. Dr. Stephen Sorensen (Dana Andrews) is doing research in geo-thermal energy; he’s convinced that if men can find a way to drill through the earth’s outer crust into the molten magma near the center, the heat can be harnessed and used to warm dwellings around the world. His assistant, Ted Rampion (Kieron Moore), is skeptical about this idea and believes that there could be dire consequences, but Sorensen boldly moves ahead with his plan, prodded by his secret knowledge that he suffers from a terminal illness and might not live long enough to undergo a longer testing period. However, Rampion’s fears soon prove well founded when Sorensen’s drilling causes a large crack in the earth which begins to rapidly expand, threatening to split the world in two with disastrous consequences. Crack in the World was praised on initial release for its intelligent approach and solid special effects work.
— Mark Deming (AllMovie) Read More »

Gordon Flemyng – Dr. Who and the Daleks (1965)

Accidentally thrown together, Dr. Who (Peter Cushing), his granddaughters, and their friend Ian cross the universe in Who’s new invention, the space and time machine known as “Tardis”. When they land on the planet Skaro, the travellers meet the kind and placid Thals, who live in fear of the dreaded Daleks. Somehow, Dr. Who and his party must find a way to help the Thals overcome the deadly mutants who live inside impenetrable metal casings. Read More »

Raymond Red – Kabaka AKA Enemy (1983)

Quote:
‘Enemy’ is elegaic science-fiction: a fable about the young men trained as Guardians of the Stars and their failure to ward off an unknon ‘enemy’ who manifests himself as white light. Read More »

Fred M. Wilcox – Forbidden Planet (1956)

Quote:
A starship crew goes to investigate the silence of a planet’s colony only to find two survivors and a deadly secret that one of them has. Read More »

Jessica Hausner – Little Joe (2019)

Little Joe follows Alice (Emily Beecham), a single mother and dedicated senior plant breeder at a corporation engaged in developing new species. She has engineered a special crimson flower, remarkable not only for its beauty but also for its therapeutic value: if kept at the ideal temperature, fed properly and spoken to regularly, this plant makes its owner happy. Against company policy, Alice takes one home as a gift for her teenage son, Joe. They christen it ‘Little Joe.’ But as their plant grows, so too does Alice’s suspicion that her new creation may not be as harmless as its nickname suggests. Read More »