Short Film

Samuel Beckett & Alan Schneider – Film (1965)

F I L M I N F O
1. Samuel Beckett made a single work for projected cinema. It’s in essence a chase film; the craziest ever committed to celluloid. It’s a chase between camera and pursued image that finds existential dread embedded in the very apparatus of the movies itself. The link to cinema’s essence is evident in the casting, as the chased object is none other than an aged Buster Keaton, who was understandably befuddled at Beckett and director Alan Schneider’s imperative that he keep his face hidden from the camera’s gaze. The archetypal levels resonate further in the exquisite cinematography of Academy Award-winner Boris Kaufman, whose brothers Dziga Vertov and Mikhail Kaufman created the legendary self-reflexive masterpiece Man With a Movie Camera. Commissioned and produced by Grove Press’s Barney Rosset, FILM is at once the product of a stunningly all-star assembly of talent, and a cinematic conundrum that asks more questions than it answers. Read More »

Daniel Raim – Ozu & Noda (2019)

A documentary by Daniel Raim on Yasujiro Ozu’s relationship with longtime screenwriter Kogo Noda. Read More »

André Marques – Luminita (2013)

Quote:
Two brothers, who haven’t spoken in years, meet at their mother’s funeral where they must deal with their mourning family, their obligations as sons and their own feelings of loss. Read More »

Carl Theodor Dreyer & Jørgen Roos – Et slot i et slot: Krogen og Kronborg AKA The Castle Within the Castle (1954)

Within its walls, Kronborg Castle in Elsinore contains large sections of another, older castle, Krogen, built by Eric of Pomerania around 1420. Discoveries unearthed during the 1926-1935 restoration of Kronborg made it possible to form a picture of Krogen, illustrated in the film by reconstruction models. Read More »

Su Friedrich – Damned If You Don’t (1987)

DAMNED IF YOU DON’T is Friedrich’s subversive and ecstatic response to her Catholic upbringing. Blending conventional narrative technique with impressionistic camerawork, symbols and voice-overs, this film creates an intimate study of sexual expression and repression. Featuring Peggy Healey as a young nun tormented by her desire for the sultry irresistible Ela Troyano. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Charlotte et son Jules AKA Charlotte and Her Boyfriend (1960)

“Charlotte et son Jules was made the year before Breathless and in many ways prefigures the arrival of that major film. Shot entirely in or from a single hotel room, it centres on Jules, played by Jean-Paul Belmondo who delivers a rapid-fire tirade about his girlfriend and their relationship when she turns up back in the apartment. The poverty of the production is indicated by the fact that the voice of the Belmondo character is that of Godard himself. But its machine gun dialogue and restless jump-cutting camera is almost an advance preview of the long sort of love scene between Michel and Patricia in Patricia’s tiny apartment in Breathless.” Read More »

Werner Nekes – Makimono (1974)

Quote:
“The title refers to Japanese landscape painting on rolls. Furthermore it indicates the film’s theme, the balance of colors (blurred tones of blue, green and grey) and the type of montage that gives priority to continuity of development rather than to disruption and contrast. This continuity is achieved by dissolvings and double exposures and by extremely long pans. The rhythm accelerates: a meditation on landscape, which unfolds before the eye or is visually paced out, gives way to fluidity and pure motion, to a feeling of dizziness, the result of two contrasting camera movements. Read More »