Short Film

Shozin Fukui – Kyatapira AKA Caterpillar (1988)

Quote:
The power of angel and fallen angel are awake and they both start to affect the function of the cyborg. Sharman and Golden Mask accelerate the speed of destruction. MIU sings a song in spite of these drive. The non-stop accelerated power barrel through the metropolice. Overwhelming cuts and sounds has got beyond the boundaries of the traditional film size. Read More »

Georges Franju – Monsieur et Madame Curie (1956)

The film highlights key moments in the life and professional collaboration of Pierre Curie and Marie Curie. Read More »

João Pedro Rodrigues & João Rui Guerra da Mata – China, China [+Extra] (2007)

Synopsis
China walks towards the Martim Moniz district, in Lisbon. When she passes the children scream: “China, China!”. China is going to fly. To escape far away at dawn. She just wants to be happy. But China drinks her own poison. She drinks it all. Sometimes the air seems loaded with evil and the purgatory is a kindergarden. Read More »

João Rui Guerra da Mata & João Pedro Rodrigues – Mahjong (2013)

Varziela, Vila do Conde, the biggest Chinatown in Portugal. A man wearing a hat and a missing woman. Read More »

Paul Vecchiali – Les roses de la vie (1962)

Short film by Paul Vecchiali; starring Germaine de France.

The chauffeur is played by the legendary director Jean Eustache. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Lothringen! (1994)

Quote:
In this 20-minute film, Jean Marie-Straub, who was born in Metz, Lorraine, unfolds the changing history of his homeland, a country torn by different wars and states. Victories are defeats and vice versa, and the land is saturated with iron, coal and blood. “Lothringen!” (“Lorraine”) is Straub’s personal account of “How Green was my Valley”, a lesson in topographical land survey and history. Read More »

Darezhan Omirbayev – Shilde AKA July (1988)

Review: Darezhan Omirbaev’s penchant for spare, elliptical narrative, muted figures, and disembodied framing (most notably, of hands and feet) have often been (favorably) compared to the rigorous aesthetic of Robert Bresson. However, in imposing such a somber – and inescapably cerebral – analogy, there is also a propensity to overlook the wry, self-effacing humor and irony of situation that pervade his films: a lyricism that equally captures the human comedy in all its contradictions and nobility from the margins of Soviet society. This sense of the quotidian as a continuum of human experience, elegantly rendered in Omirbaev’s recent film, The Road through Amir’s recurring daydream of a mother milking a cow and her intrusive child (who, in turn, looks remarkably like Amir’s own son) in rural Kazakhstan (an image that subsequently proves to be a catalytic historical memory from his childhood when man landed on the moon), can also be seen from the outset of Omirbaev’s cinema through his incorporation of a decidedly Buñuelian sequence in the short film, July of a young boy who, while on the lookout for guards near the foothills of a kolkhoz commissary, curiously finds himself wandering into a recital hall where the performance of a young pianist is punctuated by the appearance of a horseman on the stage. Read More »