Wallace Worsley – The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923)

 Wallace Worsley    The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923)

thgc Wallace Worsley    The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923)

Wikipedia wrote:
The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a 1923 American film directed by Wallace Worsley and produced by Carl Laemmle and Irving Thalberg. It stars Lon Chaney, Sr., Patsy Ruth Miller, Norman Kerry, Nigel de Brulier, Brandon Hurst. The film is probably the second most famous adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel, following the critically acclaimed, much reissued 1939 masterpiece by RKO Pictures. The film was Universal’s “Super Jewel” of 1923 and was their most successful silent film, grossing over $3 million.

The film is most notable for the grand sets that recall 15th century Paris as well as Lon Chaney’s performance and spectacular make-up as the tortured bell-ringer of Notre Dame. The film elevated Chaney, already a well-known character actor, to full star status in Hollywood. It also helped set a standard for many later horror films, including Chaney’s The Phantom of the Opera in 1925. In 1951, the film entered the public domain (in the USA) due to the claimants failure to renew its copyright registration in the 28th year after publication. Continue reading

Gustav Ucicky – Café Elektric (1927)

x43w Gustav Ucicky   Café Elektric (1927)

logoimdbb Gustav Ucicky   Café Elektric (1927)

The Café Elektric has a “mixed” clientele. This is where criminal gigolo Ferdl spends his evenings, but it´s also where men like construction tycoon Göttlinger celebrate a successful business deal with the girls. One of the girls is Hansi who dreams of a better life but remarks that “the likes of us never get out of the Elektric”. Meanwhile Göttlinger´s daughter Erni falls for Ferdl. When he demands money from her she can only steal from her father. Construction engineer Max is concerned over Erni´s possible downfall but covers her. Things change when he meets Hansi. When Ferdl uses a ring stolen by Erni to impress his former girlfriend Hansi, matters get complicated and fates entwine. Continue reading

Various – Kino-nedelya 31-35 AKA Kino-Week 31-35 (1919)

000133 Various   Kino nedelya 31 35 AKA Kino Week 31 35 (1919)

logoimdbb Various   Kino nedelya 31 35 AKA Kino Week 31 35 (1919)

Kino-nedelya was directed by Dziga Vertov, Vladimir Gardin, Lev Kuleshov and others

Quote:
In 1918 Mikhail Koltstov, who headed the Moscow Film Committee’s newsreel section, hired Vertov as his assistant. Among Vertov’s colleagues was Lev Kuleshov, who was conducting his now legendary experiments in montage, as well as Edouard Tissé, Eisenstein’s future cameraman was Lev Kuleshov, who was conducting his now legendary experiments in montage, as well as Edouard Tissé, Eisenstein’s future cameraman. Vertov began to edit documentary footage and soon was appointed editor of
Kinonedelya, the first Soviet weekly newsreel
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Anatoli Dolinov & Aleksandr Panteleyev & Donat Pashkovsky – Uplotneniye (1918)

xdvd Anatoli Dolinov & Aleksandr Panteleyev & Donat Pashkovsky   Uplotneniye (1918)

thgc Anatoli Dolinov & Aleksandr Panteleyev & Donat Pashkovsky   Uplotneniye (1918)

The first scenario work of Anatoliy Lunacharsky.

The first Soviet kinopostanovka Petrograd kinokomiteta (now – Lenfilm Studio).

November 7, 1918 – the date of the first issue on the screens of Soviet films. On this day it was released four paintings, three of them – campaign.

In order to seal one of the rooms of Professor relocated from raw basement working with his daughter. Flats start attending the factory workers. Guests are becoming more and more, and the professor begins to read popular lectures in the workers’ club. Between the younger son of a professor and his daughter working there is a feeling and the characters decide to get married …
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Cecil M. Hepworth – Alice in Wonderland (1903)

B0000CG8I8.01.LZZZZZZZ Cecil M. Hepworth   Alice in Wonderland (1903)

logoimdbb Cecil M. Hepworth   Alice in Wonderland (1903)

Feature film 1903 UK

This was the very first film version of “Alice” and encapsulated much of the “Wonderland” story into a short ten minute feature. Despite the infancy of the film-making process, the production included some creditable special effects and Alice grew and shrank to good effect. The film is preserved by the British Film Institute, although two of the sixteen scenes are missing.
“The History of the British Film: 1896-1906″ by Rachael Low and Roger Manvell (distributed in the USA by R.R. Bowker, 1948, 1973) offers this description: (see above right)
“The film is composed of sixteen scenes, dissolving very beautifully from one to another, but preceded, where necessary for the elucidation of the story, by descriptive titles.”
The book proceeds to describe the 16 scenes in considerable detail and also offers a brief entry on the Hepworth Manufacturing Company and its founder, Cecil Hepworth (born 1874). Continue reading

Clarence G. Badger – The Ropin’ Fool (1922)

qdt7 Clarence G. Badger   The Ropin Fool (1922)

thgc Clarence G. Badger   The Ropin Fool (1922)

In Ropin’ Fool (1922) Rogers plays Ropes Reilly, a cowboy who ropes anything that moves until a lynch mob decides to use Reilly’s rope for a hanging party, with Reilly as the guest of honor. Motion Picture World wrote: “Plentiful use of slow motion photography shows how it is done and dispels any possible belief that the stunts are faked. No audience can help but marvel as Rogers throws a figure eight around a galloping horse, or lassoes a rat with a piece of string, or brings to term a cat melodiously inclined.” Later Rogers would wryly claim fame as America’s “Poet Lariat.”
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pixel Clarence G. Badger   The Ropin Fool (1922)