Charles Chaplin – The Gold Rush [+Extras] (1925)

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29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Charles Chaplin   The Gold Rush [+Extras] (1925)

Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader wrote:
Charles Chaplin’s best-loved film, with the tramp down-and-out (as usual) in Alaska, where he looks for gold, falls in love with a dance-hall girl (Georgia Hale), eats his shoes for Thanksgiving dinner, and ends up a millionaire. The blend of slapstick and pathos is seamless, although the cynicism of the final scene is still surprising. Chaplin’s later films are quirkier and more personal, but this is quintessential Charlie, and unmissable. The film has been issued in several different forms with different sound tracks and cuts, including a 72-minute version butchered by Chaplin himself in the 40s. Hold out for the 1925 original, which runs 82 minutes. Continue reading

Victor Sjöström – He Who Gets Slapped (1924)

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29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Victor Sjöström   He Who Gets Slapped (1924)

Sandra Brennan at allmovie.com wrote:
This compelling and exceptionally well-executed silent drama, from new MGM studio executives Irving Thalburg and producer Louis B. Mayer is based on a highly-regarded Russian play and features the studio’s biggest stars, Lon Chaney, John Gilbert and Norma Shearer. Directed by noted Swedish filmmmaker Victor Sjostrom, it is the story of a scientific genius who is humiliated by his philandering wife and a major career set-back. To express his pain, bitterness and anger he becomes a circus clown who seems to enjoy the frequently cruel slapstick antics of his new colleagues. While in the circus, he finds a chance at renewal when he falls for a lovely bareback rider. But will he at last find happiness? Or will tragedy continue to be his closest companion? Continue reading

Fritz Lang – Harakiri (1919)

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29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Fritz Lang   Harakiri (1919)

Quote:
O-Take-San (Lil Dagover) is a beautiful young woman pursued by an evil Buddhist monk (Georg John) who wants to make her one of his many geishas. She has an affair with the Danish officer Niels Prien (Olaf J. Anderson) who leaves her alone and pregnant. O-Take-San considers ritualistic suicide when she is abandoned in this tragic melodrama directed by Fritz Lang. A nitrate print of the 1919 silent classic was found in the Dutch Film Museum and restored in 1988. ~ Dan Pavlides, All Movie Guide
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Robert J. Flaherty – Nanook of the North [+Extras] (1922)

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29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Robert J. Flaherty   Nanook of the North [+Extras] (1922)

Roger Ebert @ Chicago Sun-Times, September 25, 2005 wrote:

There is an astonishing sequence in Robert J. Flaherty’s “Nanook of the North” (1922) in which his hero, the Inuit hunter Nanook, hunts a seal. Flaherty shows the most exciting passage in one unbroken shot. Nanook knows that seals must breathe every 20 minutes, and keep an air hole open for themselves in the ice of the Arctic winter. He finds such a hole, barely big enough to be seen and is poised motionless above it with his harpoon until a seal rises to breathe. Then he strikes and holds onto the line as the seal plunges to escape.

There is a desperate tug of war. Nanook hauls the line 10 or 12 feet out of the hole, and then is dragged back, sliding across the ice, and pulls again, and again. We can’t see, but he must have the line tied to his body — to lose would be to drown. He desperately signals for his fellow hunters to help him, and we see them running across the ice with their dogs as he struggles to hold on. They arrive at last, and three or four of them pull on the line. The seal prevails. Nanook uses his knife to enlarge the hole, and the seal at last is revealed and killed. The hunters immediately strip it of its blubber and dine on its raw flesh.
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George Herriman – Krazy Kat – Bugologist (1916)

l3oita George Herriman   Krazy Kat   Bugologist (1916)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 George Herriman   Krazy Kat   Bugologist (1916)

Quote:
Krazy Kat and Ignatz set out for the wilds on Krazy’s bike; Krazy’s promises to teach Ignatz about bugology. After crashing the bike into a tree, they come upon a bee (Krazy says it’s sleeping, Ignatz says it’s dead) and an elephant. Krazy works his magic on one of them, Ignatz on the other. Hearts swell inside the animals’ chests.
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Herbert Blaché & Winchell Smith – The Saphead (1920)

BLcKYv Herbert Blaché & Winchell Smith   The Saphead (1920)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Herbert Blaché & Winchell Smith   The Saphead (1920)

The Saphead is a 1920 comedy film featuring Buster Keaton. It was the actor’s first starring role in a full-length feature and the film that launched his career.

The plot was a merging of two stories, Bronson Howard’s play The Henrietta and the novel The New Henrietta by Victor Mapes and Winchell Smith, which was meant to be an adaption of Howard’s play.
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D.W. Griffith – Way Down East (1920)

brlaE9 D.W. Griffith   Way Down East (1920)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 D.W. Griffith   Way Down East (1920)

Way Down East (1920) is a silent film directed by D. W. Griffith and starring Lillian Gish. It is one of four film adaptations of the melodramatic 19th century play Way Down East by Lottie Blair Parker. There were two earlier silent versions, and one sound version in 1935, starring Henry Fonda.
Griffith’s version is particularly remembered for its exciting climax in which Lillian Gish’s character is rescued from doom on an icy river. Some sources, quoting newspaper ads of the time, say a sequence was filmed in an early color process, possibly Technicolor or Prizmacolor.
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pixel D.W. Griffith   Way Down East (1920)