Ken Jacobs – Tom, Tom, the Piper’s Son (1969)

ChRoQP9 Ken Jacobs   Tom, Tom, the Pipers Son (1969)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Ken Jacobs   Tom, Tom, the Pipers Son (1969)

Quote:
Ken Jacobs’s avant-garde landmark (1969) is both a study in the possibilities of rephotography and a film about watching movies. It begins with a 1905 short of the same title, in which a large crowd of people tumble through a doorway, leap from a loft, and climb out of a chimney in pursuit of the eponymous pig thief. Jacobs then rephotographs the film–slowing it down, freezing frames, introducing flicker effects, and isolating portions of the frame, some so tiny that we see mostly the grain. As he varies the rhythm the film becomes a series of carefully constructed riffs on particular characters or actions, or on pure shape; new meanings emerge from the little dramas between alternating shadows, or from background elements of the original. In a gesture at once didactic and poetic, Jacobs repeats the short near the end, and now it’s glorious to behold: we see its imagery more actively and intensely, far more aware of its complex and diverse rhythms. Thus Jacobs teaches us how to resee almost any film, by mentally reframing its images or changing the speed of its action. 86 min. Continue reading

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Raúl Perrone – P3ND3JO5 (2013)

 Raúl Perrone   P3ND3JO5 (2013)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Raúl Perrone   P3ND3JO5 (2013)

Quote:
Skater musical from Buenos Aires suburb. In this silent black-and-white 4:3 format film, the hypnotising soundtrack drives the images. Love, desire, drama, faces. Perrone, the godfather of Argentine independent cinema, reinvents it in his 35th film.

Argentinian director Raúl Perrone calls P3ND3JO5 (‘pendejos': slang for teen, but also idiot or worse epithets) a ‘cumbia opera in three acts with coda’. Cumbia is rhythmic Columbian music that became immensely popular in Latin America during the 1940s.
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Polidor – Tontolini è triste (1911)

0t9HUz Polidor   Tontolini è triste (1911)

Plot
Disappointed by love, Tontolini consults a doctor about the sadness he feels. The doctor prescribes distractions and entertainment as a cure. Tontolini accepts the doctor’s advice and begins the cure by going to café chantants and theaters, where he finds nothing but moving performances that make him even sadder. (European Film Gateway) Continue reading

Charles Tutelier – La Belgique martyre AKA The martyrdom of Belgium (1919)

mIhzqTU Charles Tutelier   La Belgique martyre AKA The martyrdom of Belgium (1919)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Charles Tutelier   La Belgique martyre AKA The martyrdom of Belgium (1919)

Plot
A young Flemish peasant experiences the brutal side of war after his father has left to fight at the battle front of the Yser, his mother has been executed by German soldiers and his grandfather has been sent to an internment camp. He decides to take up arms and joins the Belgian army to avenge his mother’s death… (EFG) Continue reading

Charles Chaplin – The Gold Rush [+Extras] (1925)

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29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Charles Chaplin   The Gold Rush [+Extras] (1925)

Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader wrote:
Charles Chaplin’s best-loved film, with the tramp down-and-out (as usual) in Alaska, where he looks for gold, falls in love with a dance-hall girl (Georgia Hale), eats his shoes for Thanksgiving dinner, and ends up a millionaire. The blend of slapstick and pathos is seamless, although the cynicism of the final scene is still surprising. Chaplin’s later films are quirkier and more personal, but this is quintessential Charlie, and unmissable. The film has been issued in several different forms with different sound tracks and cuts, including a 72-minute version butchered by Chaplin himself in the 40s. Hold out for the 1925 original, which runs 82 minutes. Continue reading

pixel Charles Chaplin   The Gold Rush [+Extras] (1925)