Antonio Naharro & Álvaro Pastor – Yo, también aka Me Too (2009)

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Thirty-four-year-old Daniel is the first European with Down syndrome to have graduated from university. He starts a social services job in Seville, where he meets free-spirited co-worker Laura. They become fast friends, drawing the attention of both their co-workers and families. Their unique relationship becomes problematic when Daniel falls in love with her. But these rebellious souls refuse to bend to the rules and they find friendship and love as they have never known. Continue reading

Domingo Solano – Africa, Religion and Women (2015)

Ethiopia is a Christian island surrounded by Muslim countries and Harar is other island within that island: a difficult city for sorting, the fourth holiest city of Islam with almost a hundred mosques within its walls, and the place where the poet Arthur Rimbaud chose to refuge in his flight from Europe. Here women control on the street the sale of khat, a plant with stimulant powers that sets the pace of Harar. Consumption, ritualized in everyday life of the city, provides its inhabitants a unique identity Continue reading

Bigas Luna – Bilbao (1978)

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Plot summary:
Leo (Angel Jové), a psycopath and a silent, obsessed and deeply disturbed man, concieves a progressive fascination for Bilbao
(Isabel Pisano), a striptease ballerina, who to reach the end of the month, she has to be a prostitute. Leo studies her movements and ends up kidnapping her, as if she was his object to add to his erotic collection. Continue reading

Alberto Rodríguez – 7 vírgenes AKA 7 Virgins (2005)

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A 48-hour leave from reform school brings life lessons for the teenage protagonist of “7 Virgins,” a street-kids piece that combines energy and delicacy to striking and subtle effect. The best Spanish movie of its type since Fernando Leon’s 1998 “Barrio,” pic rises above genre standard with scrupulous attention to detail and an engaging central tandem. Downsides are lapses into sentimentality and visual deja vu, and an occasional inability to exploit the emotional potential. “Virgins” should snuggle up in plenty of fest beds, with arthouse interest a certainty in Spain-friendly territories.

Sixteen-year-old Tano (Juan Jose Ballesta from “Pellet” and “4th Floor”) is picked up from the Seville reform school by his ultra-taciturn brother Santacana (Vicente Romero), who warns Tano to avoid trouble. But once Tano gets back in touch with his irrepressible buddy, wide-grinning Richi (Jesus Carroza), within minutes, they are on the run in a shopping mall after stealing a wallet to buy a TV set — a wedding-gift for Santacana. Continue reading