Sweden

Ingmar Bergman – Sommarlek AKA Summer Interlude (1951)

While waiting for the night rehearsal of the ballet Swan Lake, the lonely twenty-eight year-old ballerina Marie receives a diary through the mail. She travels by ferry to an island nearby Stockholm, where she recalls her first love Henrik. Thirteen years ago, while traveling to spend her summer vacation with her aunt Elisabeth and her uncle Erland, Marie meets Henrik in the ferry and sooner they fall in love for each other. They spend summer vacation together when a tragedy separates them and Marie builds a wall affecting her sentimental life. Read More »

Stellan Olsson – Sven Klangs kvintett AKA Sven Klang’s Combo (1976)

Sweden 1958. In a small provincial town there is a band who plays dance music twice every week. All decisions are made by Sven Klang, the undisputed leader of the band. A new member joins them, saxophone player Lasse. He starts to criticize Sven’s decisions, questions the way they divide the money and he also wants them to be more of a jazz band.

This is a very underrated movie with a strong jazz score. Norwegian cartoon artist Cristopher Nilsen has named this as the main inspiration for his Jazzbasillen book. As people familiar with the cartoon will know, this inspiration should involve the more shady sides of jazz culture. Read More »

Mats Ek & Cullberg Ballet – Giselle (1987)

Not for the staid traditionalist, Matts EK’s ballet turns expectations on their head. The basic story is there; and Adolphe Adam’s unmistakable music guides us through. But there the similarities end.

Set in a more modern era, Albrecht is a city sophisticate to Giselle’s rural innocent. And innocent she is, but far from the shy creature of yore, this Giselle is precocious, almost uninhibited. But there’s no suggestion that this excuses Albrecht’s use and abuse of her. The ‘white’ act is very different, too. Set in a lunatic asylum, the choreography will be earily famiar to anyone who has visited one of those places (or even seen One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest). Read More »

Ingmar Bergman – Rabies (1958)

“This made-for-television film was based on Olle Hedberg’s script, which Ingmar Bergman had directed for the City Theatre of Hälsingborg as early as in 1945, and as a radio play the following year. Bergman, who called the play ‘an unpleasant piece’, used stage actors from Malmö. The scarce reviews of the film focused on Bergman’s faiblesse for the puppet theatre and the morality play, with the result that the characters functioned as types.” Read More »

Åke Falck – Bröllopsbesvär AKA Swedish Wedding Night (1964)

Max Scharnberg/IMDb wrote:
A wedding without love. The bridegroom is the owner of the greatest butcher enterprise in the town. He is also a womaniser who boasts about knowing what kinds of pants numerous girls wear. The bride is unusually beautiful. Her mother instructs her never to refuse her husband and never to argue against his side-affairs. The boy she really loves and who loves her would never do as a breadwinner. The bride’s family believes that he is working far away. Her father has not taken a full bath for many years, and the bride needs much diplomacy to make him do so on the wedding day. To obtain money for the feast the bride had sold an old cow to the slaughterhouse. Read More »

Yngve Gamlin – Jakten AKA The Chasers (1965)

Two men split from their hunting party to go on a private chase in the snowy hinterlands of northern Sweden. But what are they chasing and why? Read More »

Anders Henrikson – Annonsera! AKA It Pays to Advertise! (1936)

IMDB Summary: A comedy about the power of advertising Henry Miller is a young man who doesn’t have any goals for life. He lives on his father’s money and spends them on girls, fancy dinners and parties. One day when he goes to his father’s office, he meets a secretary, Mary and falls in love with her. She doesn’t want anything to do with him, as she wants a man who is ambitious and working for his living. Henry’s father, soap director Miller, overhears their conversation and makes a deal with Mary. If she can make Henry work, then director Miller will give her 10 000 SEK. Read More »