Tancred Ibsen

Tancred Ibsen – Den store barnedåpen AKA The Big Christening (1932)

Unable to find work, Harald (co-director Sissner) babysits for his friend Alvilde’s child when Alvilde heads off each day to her factory job. The child’s father perished at sea, and soon Harald is treating the child very much as his own; having won over her child, Harald then sets his sights on the mother. A huge critical and commercial success, The Big Christening is reminiscent of early Rene Clair both in its inventive use of sound — the opening scene, showing the start of a day at the factory, is practically a symphony of industrial machine sounds — as well as in its portrait of modest working-class lives. The film’s title refers to one of the recurring subplots, dealing with the reluctance of the church to baptize the child of an unmarried woman. Read More »