Thailand

Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit – 36 (2012)

6 is the number of shots on an analogue roll of film. It’s also the number of shots in this film. Yet it’s not a strict film, but the playful quest of a young photographer for the photos that disappeared on her computer: a whole year’s worth, including one of a challenging encounter.

The title 36 refers to the roll of film in the filmmaker’s old-fashioned analogue still camera. Each roll had 36 photos and it was always a surprise to find out after it had been developed what was on the negatives. Often the photos didn’t have much to do with each other, and often he didn’t know when and why he had taken a picture. Read More »

Boonsong Nakphoo – Scene and Life (2018)

Quote:
A country boy and his girlfriend, an old man in the paddy field, young students and traditional rice. A busy teacher and his ignorant student, an old father who is more worthless than a old wood house, a father and his little son, a mess in a new house, a man who looking for his wife, and many touched stories and characters happened in the village, Wang Pi Kul. The village was an inspiration and a location of shooting “Poor People the Great” and “Village of Hope” that were directed by Boonsong Nakphoo. Read More »

Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit – Die Tomorrow (2017)

Quote:
Are you afraid of death? According to statistics, two people on earth die each second. Die Tomorrow zeroes in on the last day of its protagonists, each of whom have no idea of their fate. The film picks up on six everyday situations and turns them into moving stories. With true lightness of touch, director Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit forges shots that play out over considerable time and then combines them with documentary-like interview footage, news reports, sound recordings, statistics and archive material, thus creating an elaborate essay. Read More »

Pimpaka Towira – Maha Samut Lae Susaan AKA The Island Funeral (2015)

Quote:
Set in the deep South of Thailand, where separatist violence has claimed nearly 7,000 lives in the past 13 years, The Island Funeral is a meditation on faith, identity and a place uncharted by any map. Laila, with her brother and his friend, head from Bangkok on a thousand-kilometer road trip to Pattani. Along the way they meet Surin, a soldier from the Northeast. Together they journey into the southernmost part of the country in search of lost history and half-remembered memories. Read More »

Khru Marut – Santi-Vina (1954)

Santi, a poor 10- year-old blind boy who lives with his father. Vina takes a pity on him and tries to protect him from the bullying of Krai. Santi’s father send him to stay with Luang Ta, a respectable monk, hopefully that he would learn the Buddhist lessons and by doing good deed, he could regain his eyesight.

When they have grown up, Santi and Vina become lover. Krai feels jealous because he also love Vina. Krai asks his parent to make a marriage proposal to Vina. Vina decides to run away with Santi. However, they are finally caught and Santi is severe beaten. Read More »

Anucha Boonyawatana – Malila: The Farewell Flower (2017)

Quote:
The the visually stunning new Thai relationship drama Malila: The Farewell Flower, former gay lovers Shane and Pitch reunite after years apart and try to heal the wounds of their past. Shane is haunted by the tragic death of his daughter, while Pitch suffers a grave illness, rejecting medical treatment as painful and ineffective.

A talented artist, Pitch creates beautiful structures made out of flowers and banana leaves as a way to cope with his deteriorating health. Meanwhile, Shane trains to become a Buddhist monk, in an effort to build karma for Pitch… to either keep him alive or to help him along in his afterlife. Read More »

Pen-Ek Ratanaruang – Invisible Waves (2006)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

SYNOPSIS

By RUSSELL EDWARDS (Variety)

Bad karma does a slow fade, but gives the occasional wink, in “Invisible Waves,” Pen-ek Ratanaruang’s highly anticipated followup to “Last Life in the Universe.” Thai helmer, Japanese heartthrob Asano Tadanobu and Oz lenser Christopher Doyle form a pleasing combination of malevolence supported by dry wit. English-lingo limitations of the thesps will hamper sales in some territories, but the pic should go gangbusters throughout Asia and on the festival circuit.

In film noir tradition, the pic opens with Macau-residing Japanese assassin-cum-chef Kyoji (Asano Tadanobu) holding a man at gunpoint. Seiko (Tomono Kuga), the Japanese wife of Kyoji’s boss, arrives at Kyoji’s apartment to continue their steamy affair. Instead, Kyoji poisons her dinner. The next day, the newly widowed Wiwat (Toon Hiranyasup) has closed the up-market Hong Kong restaurant in which Kyoji works his day job. Read More »