Thriller

Alfred Hitchcock – The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

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Bob (Leslie Banks) and Jill Lawrence (Edna Best) are on a winter sports holiday with their teenage daughter. When their friend Louis Bernard is shot whilst dancing with Jill, he tells Bob of an assassination about to take place in London.

Fearing that their plot will be revealed, the assassins kidnap their daughter in order to keep the Lawrence’s quiet.
Bob and Jill return to London and take matters into their own hands.
In this movie we can beside Leslie Banks and Edna Best also see Peter Lorre. Read More »

J. Lee Thompson – The Reincarnation of Peter Proud (1975)

When college professor Peter Proud begins to experience flashbacks from a previous incarnation, he is mysteriously drawn to a place he has never been before but which is troublingly familiar. As if drawn to her by cosmic force, he soon finds himself unwittingly in the company of his previous incarnation’s wife. This woman, Marcia Curtis, recognizes in Peter startling characteristics which he shares with her dead husband, Jeff. Even the sound of his voice seems at times to be that of the dead man. Peter becomes romantically drawn to Ann Curtis who is or was his daughter (Jeff and Marcia’s daughter). Recognizing the incestuous nature of their relationship, Mrs. Curtis tries to keep the two young people apart. But how? Must she reveal the terrible secret of the final minutes she shared with her husband in order to keep this man from her (their?) daughter? Read More »

Ole Bornedal – Fri os fra det onde AKA Deliver Us from Evil (2009)

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A father returns to his old hometown with his young family. Events force him to face the small town’s xenophobia.

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Lars and Johannes are brothers with very little in common. Johannes is a high-powered lawyer with a beautiful wife and two children; Lars is a truck driver and a drunken brute who beats his girlfriend. Having returned to his hometown in the country, Johannes hopes for a less hectic, more genuine lifestyle. But trouble is underfoot when Lars runs over a woman with his truck. He sees only one way out: put the blame on Alain, a Bosnian refugee with impaired mental functions. But when Lars, the God-fearing husband of the victim, and his friends close in on the Bosnian, Johannes stands up for the man and shelters him. Read More »

Alex Stockman – Pulsar (2010)

Samuel works in Brussels as a pharmaceutical delivery man. His gorgeous girlfriend Mireille heads off to New York to intern at a prestigious architecture firm. Shortly after her departure, Sam’s computer is hacked. A series of rather dodgy IT-guys fail to protect his wireless network. The mysterious hacker seems intent on screwing up Samuel’s life and his relationship with Mireille. Paranoia kicks in. Sam starts to suspect his neighbours and gets obsessed with WiFi-rays… Love, paranoia and two lovers separated by an ocean of communication devices. Read More »

William Friedkin – To Live and Die in L.A. (1985)

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Worthy of the director of “French Connection,” the pace of this set- in-LA action thriller immediately draws the view in and never lets up. A car chase in the best traditions of “Bullitt” and of Friedkin’s own “French Connection” is centers the action, but the motivation of a rogue agent obsessed with the death of his partner, and clearly with his own death, are well- and credibly- drawn. The most sympathetic character in the story is not one of the principals. It is a female informer. An ex-con at the mercy of those on both sides of the law, she is callously exploited by all. Her feelings for Agent Chance are more implied than explicit, but they are believable as is his indifference to her as a person. This riveting film never lets your attention wander. Thanks to Friedkin, we are told, we are given a credible ending to this taut, tightly- wound thriller. An under-exposed, under-appreciated work; excellent for the genre. Read More »

Hal Hartley – Fay Grim (2006)

Hal Hartley’s dark comedy “Henry Fool” was an indie masterpiece that effectively and accessibly meshed Hartley’s literary influences with his specific minimalist style and some of the most memorable characters of the last decade. Now, Hartley takes the characters he created for that world and launches them into a surprisingly different direction in “Fay Grim,” a worthy follow-up and rare art house sequel. Read More »

Dejan Zecevic – T.T. Sindrom (2002)

Several people get locked in a turkish bath at night, being hunted by a brutal serial killer, who seems to be seized with the T.T. Syndrome, a brain malady that leads to painful sociopathy. Read More »