Tinto Brass – Salon Kitty [+Extras] (1976)

30424 large Tinto Brass   Salon Kitty [+Extras] (1976)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Tinto Brass   Salon Kitty [+Extras] (1976)

Synopsis
Tinto Brass scored his first major international success with this shocking but stylish tale of decadence in the Third Reich, inspired by a true story. Madame Kitty (Ingrid Thulin) is the proprietor of one of Berlin’s most luxurious brothels, where many members of the Nazi high command are her regular customers. Kitty is approached by Helmut Wallenberg (Helmut Berger), an S.S. official who orders her to shut down her business and act as his partner as he founds a new bordello, which will exclusively cater to the elite of the Nazi Party and the German military. Unknown to Kitty, Wallenberg’s brothel has been staffed entirely by women recruited by the S.S. for their loyalty to the Reich, and each room has been equipped with secret recording devices, which will allow Wallenberg and his staff to not only gather blackmail material against troublesome officers, but to discover who might be expressing disloyal thoughts about Hitler’s regime when their guard is down. Margherita (Teresa Ann Savoy), a pretty young prostitute working for Kitty, is especially devoted to both her job and her country, but when she falls in love with Biondo (John Steiner), a German officer and frequent customer who has grown disillusioned with both the war and National Socialism, she discovers the true purpose of “Salon Kitty,” and sets out to destroy the operation, with Kitty’s help. Both a scandal and a success in Europe, Salon Kitty initially played the exploitation circuit in the United States in an edited version titled Madame Kitty, though the shorter version still earned an X rating.
~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide
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Tinto Brass – L’Uomo Che Guarda AKA The Voyeur (1994)

 Tinto Brass   LUomo Che Guarda AKA The Voyeur (1994)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Tinto Brass   LUomo Che Guarda AKA The Voyeur (1994)

Description: “When his wife Silvia (Polish model Katarina Vasilissa) leaves him, Dodo (Francesco Casale), a professor of French literature, finds himself alienated from those around him; becoming a passive viewer of life lead to the fullest by those around him including his bedridden father (Brass regular Franco Branciaroli) who has a scantily-clad nurse to attend to him. Dodo’s agonizing over his wife’s contempt for him and the identify of the mysterious lover who has usurped him is countered with lighter vignettes (mostly lighter, though one moment has one of Brass’ starlets showing her infibulation scars which feels exploitative though we must commend the actress for not feeling ashamed considering how psychologically and physically damaging this cultural practice can be) in which Dodo winds up the voyeur instead of a participant which insure a positive reaction from Dodo to his wife’s faithlessness in the Brass tradition. Continue reading

Tinto Brass – La chiave aka The key (1983)

tnxc Tinto Brass   La chiave aka The key (1983)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Tinto Brass   La chiave aka The key (1983)

R E V I E W B Y D E R E K H I L L
Director Tinto Brass is a man of big passions. His films — excluding Caligula (1980), which doesn’t really fit into his overall body of work — are filled with curvaceous women who are uninhibited and bold enough to freely express their healthy appetites for sex. Brass’ camera lovingly (and intrusively) explores the many facets of a woman’s beauty, be it physical or psychological. Brass also isn’t shy about what he likes most about a woman’s body, either — her ample backside. The bigger the better.
Although Brass would probably chuckle at the idea that his films have a strong feminist slant, Brass’ female leads are strong, independent, and almost heroic in their quests to become emancipated from their roles as housewives, concubines, or mothers. Less cartoonish than his American counterpart Russ Meyer’s heroines, Brass’ ladies actually exude a real humanity with their sensuality.
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Tinto Brass – Snack Bar Budapest (1988)

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29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Tinto Brass   Snack Bar Budapest (1988)

A disbarred lawyer, recently released from prison and now involved with organized crime, checks into the Snack Bar Budapest where he is instructed to make contact with the up-and-coming local kingpin, a 19-year-old punk-pimp-gangster named Molecola (Italian for “molecule”); a Buffalo-trained politician trying to run out the local shops and turn the town into a giant casino-entertainment complex, with the Snack Bar as the centrepiece. Continue reading

Mauro Bolognini & Tinto Brass & Luigi Comencini – La mia signora aka My wife (1964)

lamiasignora1 Mauro Bolognini & Tinto Brass & Luigi Comencini   La mia signora aka My wife (1964)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Mauro Bolognini & Tinto Brass & Luigi Comencini   La mia signora aka My wife (1964)

Alberto Sordi co-stars with Silvia Mangano in this Dino DeLaurentiis comedy production gang-directed by Tinto Brass, Mauro Bolognini, and Luigi Comenichi. The sketches primarily deal with the endearing battles between husbands and wives, giving Sordi the chance to mug for the camera in the comic fashion that made him famous. ~ Dan Pavlides, All Movie Guide Continue reading

Tinto Brass – Il disco volante aka The Flying Saucer (1964)

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29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Tinto Brass   Il disco volante aka The Flying Saucer (1964)

Quote:

A gem! This is one of the last of the great movie comedies. Famous producer Dino De Laurentiis hired Brass to direct Rodolfo Sonego’s satirical political parable, “Il disco volante”, starring Alberto Sordi in four rôles, along with Silvana Mangano and Monica Vitti. Brass’s direction is flawlessly smooth, Sordi is at his most brilliant with his priceless doubletakes, and the film is screamingly funny. But since Brass did not write or edit it, “Il disco volante” is not a true-blue Brass film, though its anti-authoritarianism is certainly congenial to his outlook. The story concerns witnesses to some flying saucers that land in a village near Venice. They spin enough yarns that the police are brought in to arrest the visitors, but plans go awry when the aliens just want to party and when a few villagers start trafficking in Martians. Good movies are impossible to describe. Good comedies are even more impossible to describe. Take my word for it, though, you’ll like it! Continue reading

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