TV

Bille August – Den goda viljan AKA The Best Intentions (1991)

Scripted (but not directed) by Ingmar Bergman, Best Intentions is a multilayered backwards glance at the courtship of Bergman’s own parents. Henrik Bergman (Samuel Froler) is a struggling theology student in the year 1909. His intended, Anna Aakerbloom (Pernilla August, who married director Bille August while the film was in progress) is from a well-to-do family. Despite the expected class differences and personality clashes, love-or at least mutual understanding-prevails. But after a harsh, spare few years as the wife of a clergyman, Anna yearns for the more bountiful pleasures of her family home. Bergman writes himself into the proceedings as a mewling infant. The current three-hour theatrical version of Best Intentions (original title: Den Goda Viljan) was simultaneously prepared as a six-hour TV miniseries, which ran in Europe, Scandanavia, and Japan. Read More »

    Jerzy Skolimowski – To nie my AKA It’s Not Us (2020)

    HBO Europe has commissioned Polish at Home, a series of 14 short films about isolation from 16 Polish filmmakers working during lockdown.

    The project asked 16 filmmakers (two projects are collaborations) to create 14 short films. The plots must take place in the time of the pandemic, they cannot exceed 10 minutes, all must adhere to lockdown restrictions and the filmmakers must shoot them on their own in four weeks, although the format and genre is up to them. Read More »

      Jonathan Glazer – Strasbourg 1518 (2020)

      Synopsis
      Strasbourg 1518 Inspired by a powerful involuntary mania which took hold of citizens in the city of Strasbourg just over 500 years ago, this film is a collaboration in isolation with some of the greatest dancers working today. Read More »

        Jonathan Miller – Othello (1981)

        As with most of Miller’s productions, the visual inspiration came from sixteenth-century Mediterranean painters, in this case Tintoretto, El Greco and Velasquez. At 205 minutes, this is one of the longest BBC Shakespeare productions, and the text is duly presented almost complete, with only minor trims to material rendered redundant by small-screen restaging. Read More »

          Dietrich Haugk – Der Kommissar – Als die Blumen Trauer trugen (EP 39) aka The Day the Flowers were mourning (1971)

          Dr. Trotta is shot at night in his garden. He was a fan of the odd band “Joker Five” among which Keller suspects the perpetrator. The female singer of this band, a friend of Trottas son Peter, died a few weeks earlier of complications of an abortion. A direct guilt can be proved, but who bears the moral responsibility for the tragic event? Read More »

            Richard Loncraine & Dennis Potter – Blade on the Feather (1980)

            New York Times:
            THE setting is a rather grand English country home on the Isle of Wight. Two women are bickering as they play lawn tennis. An elderly man reading beneath a tree spots a fly on his hand and begins having an odd attack. A young stranger suddenly appears and gives the man mouth-to-mouth resuscitation or, so to speak, a kiss of life. Later, the victim will thank him for having braved not only the garlic on his breath but ”an old man’s slack mouth.” Read More »

              Gavin Millar & Dennis Potter – Cream in My Coffee (1980)

              Cream in My Coffee is a television drama by Dennis Potter, broadcast on ITV on 2 November 1980 as the last in a loosely connected trilogy of plays exploring language and betrayal. A juxtaposition between youth and old age, the play combines a non-linear narrative with the use of popular music to heighten dramatic tension, a feature of much of Potter’s work. Cream in My Coffee was awarded the Prix Italia for best drama in 1981 and Peggy Ashcroft gained a BAFTA Best Actress award in 1981. The play’s title is taken from the popular song “You’re the Cream in My Coffee”, from the 1929 Broadway musical Hold Everything! Read More »