Jean Renoir – Le Petit théâtre de Jean Renoir AKA Little Theater of Jean Renoir (1970)

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thgc Jean Renoir   Le Petit théâtre de Jean Renoir AKA Little Theater of Jean Renoir (1970)

Made for television, this film consists of four parts: Part One, “The Last Christmas Dinner,” is about the relationship between an old man and an old woman, both homeless. Part Two, “The Electric Floor Polisher,” is an opera-like story of a woman who is obsessed with polishing her floors. Part Three is a musical interlude featuring Jeanne Moreau singing “When Love Dies.” Part Four, “The Virtue of Tolerance,” concerns an old man, his young wife, and how they come to terms when she has an affair with a man her own age. Continue reading

Orson Welles – The AFI Lifetime Achievement Award: A Tribute to Orson Welles (1975)

caz1 Orson Welles   The AFI Lifetime Achievement Award: A Tribute to Orson Welles (1975)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Orson Welles   The AFI Lifetime Achievement Award: A Tribute to Orson Welles (1975)

In 1975, the American Film Institute bestowed upon Orson Welles their third Lifetime Achievement Award. (The first went to John Ford and the second to James Cagney.) This program, which originally aired on CBS, features a host of actors and other celebrities — Frank Sinatra, Johnny Carson, Joseph Cotton and Charlton Heston — who pay tribute to Welles’ brilliant but tumultuous career.

Throughout the night, many different people speak about the filmmaking contributions Welles made throughout his career, and clips from many of Welles’ films — Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, The Lady from Shanghai, Touch of Evil, Falstaff etc. — are shown. It’s rumored that Welles didn’t want to show up unless the AFI would let him show some clips from his then in-production but now-incomplete film, The Other Side of the Wind, so the AFI indulged him and let him show a few clips. (The last screen grab is from one of the film’s scenes.)

For Welles fans, this is a must-see event, as it’s great to see him honored by so many of his colleagues. Continue reading

Juan Luis Buñuel & Claude Chabrol – Fantômas (1980)

nv8kt5 Juan Luis Buñuel & Claude Chabrol   Fantômas (1980)

thgc Juan Luis Buñuel & Claude Chabrol   Fantômas (1980)

Quote:
This miniseries based on the Fantomas novels of Marcel Allain and Pierre Souvestre, takes the Fantomas character back to his sinister roots. After the comedic Andre Hunabelle films of the 60s, filmmakers Claude Charbrol and Juan Bunuel went back to the original books for their inspiration. The results are magnificent. The series is a reinvestigation of the pulp roots of the character, while infusing the surreal, dreamlike qualities that the original texts inspired in the works of Juan Gris, Rene Magritte and Luis Bunuel (who is referenced, along with Apollinaire, in the first episode.) Continue reading

Hubert Cornfield – Operation Cicero (1956)

c39u Hubert Cornfield   Operation Cicero (1956)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Hubert Cornfield   Operation Cicero (1956)

(from tv.com) :
Based on the true story of a World War II spy with access to top secret information in the British embassy in Turkey, this episode follows the brief but bright career of an English valet, code-named Cicero, who seized his chance to sell expensive secrets to the Germans, including details about D-Day’s Operation Overlord. The Nazi government, the British ambassador, and a Polish countess all dance on strings even as British counteragents close in. Continue reading

Robert Altman – Tanner ’88 (1988)

YPgk4lE Robert Altman   Tanner 88 (1988)

thgc Robert Altman   Tanner 88 (1988)

Summary: In 1988, renegade filmmaker Robert Altman and Pulitzer Prize–winning Doonesbury cartoonist Garry Trudeau created a presidential candidate, ran him alongside the other hopefuls during the primary season, and presented their media campaign as a cross between a soap opera and TV news. The result was the groundbreaking Tanner ’88, a piercing satire of media-age American politics, in which actors Michael Murphy (as contender Jack Tanner) and Cynthia Nixon (as his daughter) rub elbows on the campaign trail with real-life political players Jesse Jackson, Gary Hart, Bob Dole, Ralph Nader, Kitty Dukakis, and Gloria Steinem, among many others. The Criterion Collection is proud to present the complete eleven-episode television series—more relevant today than ever. Continue reading

Maurice Pialat – La Maison des bois [Chapters 4 - 7] (1971)

0gd4 Maurice Pialat   La Maison des bois [Chapters 4   7] (1971)

thgc Maurice Pialat   La Maison des bois [Chapters 4   7] (1971)

Quote:
Compared by critics to Jean Renoir and Ken Loach,
French director-actor Maurice Pialat is now recognised
as one of world cinema’s profoundly humanists
filmmakers. Pialat was born into the same filmmaking
generation as Nouvelle Vague icons Godard and
Truffaut, or the “Left Bank” filmmaking movement’s
Alain Resnais and Chris Marker. But having trained as a
director of observational documentary, Pialat turned
away from the intellectual play and cinephillia of his
peers. Instead, in landmark films such as POLICE
(1985), the Cannes-winning SOUS LE SOLEIL DE SATAN
(1987) and VAN GOGH (1991) he evolved a style that’s
may become contemporary cinema’s most influential: a
cinema of naturalism, spiritual passion and
instinctive social engagement. Continue reading

Maurice Pialat – La maison des bois (Chapters 1- 3) (1971)

0gd4 Maurice Pialat   La maison des bois (Chapters 1  3) (1971)

thgc Maurice Pialat   La maison des bois (Chapters 1  3) (1971)

Quote:
Compared by critics to Jean Renoir and Ken Loach,
French director-actor Maurice Pialat is now recognised
as one of world cinema’s profoundly humanists
filmmakers. Pialat was born into the same filmmaking
generation as Nouvelle Vague icons Godard and
Truffaut, or the “Left Bank” filmmaking movement’s
Alain Resnais and Chris Marker. But having trained as a
director of observational documentary, Pialat turned
away from the intellectual play and cinephillia of his
peers. Instead, in landmark films such as POLICE
(1985), the Cannes-winning SOUS LE SOLEIL DE SATAN
(1987) and VAN GOGH (1991) he evolved a style that’s
may become contemporary cinema’s most influential: a
cinema of naturalism, spiritual passion and
instinctive social engagement. Continue reading

pixel Maurice Pialat   La maison des bois (Chapters 1  3) (1971)