United Kingdom

Karel Reisz – Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (1966)

Quote:
From Karel Reisz, the renowned director of Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, Night Must Fall, Isadora, The Gambler, Who’ll Stop the Rain, The French Lieutenant’s Woman and Sweet Dreams, comes this cult classic starring screen great Vanessa Redgrave (Julia, Mary, Queen of Scots) and legendary character actor David Warner (Cross of Iron, Perfect Friday) in one of his few starring roles. A gorilla-fixated artist with distinctly anarchist tendencies, Morgan (Warner) tries to regain the affections of his divorced wife Leonie (Redgrave) by variously kidnapping her, attempting to blow up her future mother-in-law and attacking her fiancé (Robert Stephens, Sherlock Holmes of Billy Wilder’s The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes). Cut with scenes from King Kong and Tarzan films, Morgan’s depiction of madness, dark humor and vintage performances made it one of the wildest, funniest and most provocative comedies of the ’60s. Nominated for two Oscars: Best Actress in a Leading Role (Redgrave) and Best Costume Design, Black-and-White (Jocelyn Rickards). Read More »

    Lech Majewski – The Garden of Earthly Delights (2004)

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    Working from his own novel Metaphysics, writer-director Lech Majewski (Glass Lips, Gospel According to Harry) crafts magic in The Garden of Earthly Delights intimate passion plays, which are filled with loving detail (Village Voice) and creates a luminous, highly erotic treatise on art, love and death (Chicago Reader). When London art historian Claudine (Claudine Spiteri) meets engineer Chris (Chris Nightingale), it is love and lust at first sight. But their spiritual and erotic connection is threatened by a devastating and deadly illness. Read More »

      Andrew Kotting – Gallivant (1997)

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      Gallivant is a fantastic British road movie and Andrew Kotting deserves to take his place with those two other great film iconoclasts and chroniclers of late twentieth century life in Britain: Derek Jarman and Patrick Keiller. He is also a great stylist and humourist, which makes the film very accessible despite it’s restless experimentation and disregard for documentary conventions. Read More »

        Jane Arden & Jack Bond – Anti-Clock (1980)

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        A complex and fascinating experimental exploration of time and identity. Anti-Clock is a film of authentic, startling originality.

        Brilliantly mixing cinema and video techniques, Arden and Bond have created a movie that captures the anxiety and sense of danger that has infiltrated the consciousness of so many people in western society.

        Filled with high tension and high intelligence, Anti-Clock is mysterious, disturbing, fascinating and exciting’. (Jack Kroll, Newsweek) Read More »

          Robert Hughes – American Visions Vol. 1-8 (1997)

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          Writing with all the brilliance, authority, and pungent wit that have distinguished his art criticism for Time magazine and his greatly acclaimed study of modern art, The Shock of the New, Robert Hughes now addresses his largest subject: the history of art in America. Read More »

            Lance Comfort – The Breaking Point (1961)

            Quote:
            Based on a novel by Laurence Meynell, this film tells of a young businessman from England who who gets involved in a scheme to inundate a small communist country in the Middle East with counterfeit money. Things do not go as planned when his wife begins digging into matters. This thriller runs a short 59 minutes. ~ Kristie Hassen, Rovi Read More »

              Jonathan Glazer – Strasbourg 1518 (2020)

              Synopsis
              Strasbourg 1518 Inspired by a powerful involuntary mania which took hold of citizens in the city of Strasbourg just over 500 years ago, this film is a collaboration in isolation with some of the greatest dancers working today. Read More »