United Kingdom

Seth Holt – Station Six-Sahara (1963)



Synopsis:
‘At an isolated oil pumping station deep in the African desert, workers Kramer, Fletcher, Macey, Martin, and Santos are tense, lonely, and love-starved. A little excitement unexpectedly comes into their lives when they rescue a couple, Jimmy and Catherine, from a wreck. While Jimmy is bed-ridden with his injuries, Catherine flirtatiously arouses passions and inflames simmering resentments among the oil crew.’
– Karl Williams Read More »

Ewald André Dupont – Cape Forlorn AKA The Love Storm (1931)



William Kell, the keeper of a lighthouse a lonely stretch of coastline in New Zealand, marries cabaret dancer Eileen. His young wife, however, goes on to have an affair with Henry Cass, the handsome assistant. Later on she begins to flirt with a stranger from a wreckage. A chain of events is set in motion…

Also filmed by Dupont in German (Menschen im Käfig) and French (Le cap perdu) versions with different casts. Read More »

Steve Roberts – Sir Henry at Rawlinson End (1980)


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PLOT:
Vivian Stanshall’s priceless film of exquisite lunacy is is a work of absurd genius. The labyrinthine plot sees Sir Henry, a mad aristocratic war veteran, attempt to exorcise the trouserless ghost of his dead brother, Humbert, whom he accidentally killed in a drunken duck-shooting accident. This is aided, or hindered, by his mad family and servants including the tapeworm-obsessed Mrs. E; Old Scrotum; the eternally knitting Aunt Florrie; the Lady Philippa of Stains, a turkey-legged old soak. With German POW’s in the garden, a mechanical bulldog, a horse in the billiards room and a marriage bed furnished with a barbed-wire divide, the mayhem of Rawlinson End is endless…
-Vivian Stanshall Read More »

Stephen Quay, Timothy Quay, Keith Griffiths, Larry Sider – Punch & Judy: Tragical Comedy or Comical Tragedy (1981)



Quote:
Following Punch and Judy from their malevolent medieval personas through their much-mollified assimilation into English folklore, this film finally restores the odd couple to their rightful roles as hair-raising anarchists. It is a stunning mixture of mime, mask, painting, crudely animated documents and mischievously reanimated newsreels, as well as the demonic atonalities of a modernist opera by Harrison Britwistle brought to “life” in a puppet fantasy/nightmare. Read More »

Les Blair – Bad Behaviour (1993)



Innovative direction by Les Blair when constructing this too little known work, a collaboration with skilled players, includes the provision to the cast of only a mere outline, in lieu of a script, that ultimately expands into a 25 page scenario sans written dialogue. He motivates his actors to give dimension for the mere flinders furnished them, through pure improvisation that is grounded upon their own frames of reference. The outcome proves to be a nice job all around that ruffles some of the standards that have been adopted by cinema enthusiasts. Read More »

John Pilger – Stealing a Nation (2004)


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Quote:
Pilger tells a story literally ‘hidden from history’.

In the 1960s and 70s, British governments, conspiring with American officials, tricked into leaving, then expelled the entire population of the Chagos islands in the Indian Ocean.

The aim was to give the principal island of this Crown Colony, Diego Garcia, to the Americans who wanted it as a major military base. Indeed, from Diego Garcia US planes have since bombed Afghanistan and Iraq.

The story is told by islanders who were dumped in the slums of Mauritius and in the words of the British officials who left a ‘paper trail’ of what the International Criminal Court now describes as ‘a crime against humanity’ . Read More »

Dave McKean – Luna (2014)



Quote:
Grant and Christine are still struggling with a storm of grief following the death of their baby. They visit an old friend, Dean, with his new girlfriend, Freya, in an isolated house by the sea. Dean tries but fails to control his drinking. Freya worries about the age difference between her and Dean. Christine confesses her secrets to Dean, upsetting his comfortable world of escapist fantasy and children’s books. Over a long weekend, old loves, losses and resentments are revisited and the life of the dead child is lived out in a series of strange dreams. Read More »