United Kingdom

Renny Rye – Cold Lazarus (1996)

review.com wrote:

Cold Lazarus is the companion piece to Karaoke (see our review), and the last work Dennis Potter wrote as he struggled against his fatal illness. While Karaoke can stand on its own, Cold Lazarus is best understood as a companion piece or sequel to it. Donald Feeld, the writer from Karaoke (and, in many respects, Dennis Potter’s alter ego), hints at his own final project in Karaoke, one in which he wishes to combine virtual reality and cryogenics. That, then, is what Potter did here.
Cold Lazarus is set in the year 2368. A group of scientists at a cryogenic laboratory have come close to being able to revive the memories of a preserved brain, projecting it in fits and spurts on a huge screen at the lab. The brain — the mind that they are mining — is, of course, none other than that of Donald Feeld, and therefore many of the memories are actually scenes from Karaoke. Read More »

Mike Leigh – Another Year (2010)

Quote:
Mike Leigh is often accused of talking down to his characters. With Another Year, this fan of the British auteur can see why. Leigh’s latest is a lovingly told but insufficiently nuanced story of four seasons, a year in the lives of a happy couple and their miserably single friends. It begins in spring with a close-up of a face locked in abject misery: Asked by a counselor how happy she is on a scale from one to 10, Janet (Imelda Staunton) says one, in effect setting the tone for much of the film. The only happiness here belongs to Gerri (Ruth Sheen) and her husband, Tom (Jim Broadbent), whose relationship is as organic as the vegetables they grow in their backyard, but what’s their secret? No one’s asking, including Leigh. Read More »

Joseph Losey – Time Without Pity (1957)

Quote:
One of the powerhouses of the 1950s, Time Without Pity is the first film that Joseph Losey signed with his own name after being blacklisted and fleeing the U.S. In effect, it’s the film in which Losey proclaimed himself a Brit, as eager and willing to skewer the establishment there as he had done on the other side of the Atlantic. It’s the one with Michael Redgrave, in a bravura performance, as the alcoholic father in a race against the clock to save his son, whom we know is innocent, from being executed for murder. The film takes aim at capital punishment. Read More »

Joseph Losey – Figures in a Landscape (1970)

THE BIRD HAS COME FOR ITS PREY.

Two escaped convicts (Robert Shaw and Malcolm McDowell) are on the run in an unnamed Latin American country. But everywhere they go, they are followed and hounded by a menacing black helicopter. Read More »

Andy Milligan – Guru, the Mad Monk (1970)

A deranged 15th Century prison colony chaplain exploits his power to get money for his church including murder and grave robbing committed by his vampire mistress and one-eyed hunchback assistant. Read More »

Roy Ward Baker – The Vampire Lovers [+commentary] (1970)

Synopsis:
The Countess is called away to tend a sick friend and imposes on the General to accept her daughter Marcilla as a houseguest. Some of the villagers begin dying, however, and the General’s daughter Laura soon gets weak and pale, but Marcilla is there to comfort her. The villagers begin whispering about vampires as Marcilla finds another family on which to impose herself. The pattern repeats as Emma gets ill, but the General cannot rest, and seeks the advice of Baron Hartog, who once dealt a decisive blow against a family of vampires. Well, almost. Read More »

Freddie Francis – Mumsy, Nanny, Sonny and Girly AKA Girly (1970)

Synopsis:
Sexy, teenaged, immature Girly and her camera-wielding brother Sonny bring home unsuspecting men to Mumsy and Nanny, where they play games, and if they don’t follow the rules, they’re sent to the angels. One day they bring home a New Friend who has a few ideas for games of his own, though, and he begins to turn the foursome against each other. Read More »