United Kingdom

James Ivory – Maurice (1987)

Quote:
Set against the stifling conformity of pre-World War I English society, E.M. Forster’s Maurice is a story of coming to terms with one’s sexuality and identity in the face of disapproval and misunderstanding. Maurice Hall (James Wilby) and Clive Durham (Hugh Grant) find themselves falling in love at Cambridge. In a time when homosexuality is punishable by imprisonment, the two must keep their feelings for one another a complete secret. After a friend is arrested and disgraced for “the unspeakable vice of the Greeks,” Clive abandons his forbidden love and marries a young woman. Read More »

Jack Gold – The Bofors Gun [+Extras] (1968)

A drama set in post-war Germany. A small detachment of British National Servicemen faces
internal strife and a meltdown of Army discipline. Read More »

John Boulting – Brighton Rock (1948)

Synopsis:
Pinkie Brown is a small-town hoodlum whose gang runs a protection racket based at Brighton race course. When Pinkie murders a journalist called Fred Hale whom he believes is responsible for the death of a fellow gang-member, the police believe it to be suicide. This doesn’t convince Ida Arnold, who was with Fred just before he died, and she sets out to find the truth. She comes across naive waitress Rose, who can prove that Fred was murdered. In an attempt to keep Rose quiet Pinkie marries her. But with his gang beginning to doubt his ability, and his rivals taking over his business, Pinkie starts to become more desperate and violent. Read More »

Christopher Morahan – Diamonds for Breakfast (1968)

Quote:
BRAND NEW 2K MASTER! Four thieves try to steal the Imperial Jewels of Russia! Swinging playboy Grand Duke Nicholas Wladimirovitch Goduno (Marcello Mastroianni, Marriage Italian Style), a direct descendent of the Romanov family who were overthrown in the Russian Revolution of 1917, learns that his family’s crown jewels will be exhibited at a London museum and plots to steal them. He gathers a crew of beautiful but dangerous women, led by Bridget Rafferty (Rita Tushingham, The Knack… and How to Get It), to assist in his plot against Popov (Warren Mitchell, The Crawling Eye), the Soviet functionary in charge of the exhibit. Wonderfully directed by Christopher Morahan (Clockwise) and beautifully shot by Gerry Turpin (Seance on a Wet Afternoon, The Whisperers). Read More »

Leo Regan – 100 Per Cent White (2000)

Quote:
A decade after taking a series of photographs of skinhead members of a far-right group for his book Public Enemies, Leo Regan returns to three members of the gang to see what has happened to them in the intervening years. Read More »

Margaret Tait – Blue Black Permanent (1992)

Quote:
The film’s complex, ‘Russian Doll’ narrative spans three generations of an Orcadian family. Barbara’s attempt to understand her past forms its outer shell. Flashbacks to her mother Greta and Grandmother Mary form the second and third layers, as the action in both past and present switches between Orkney and Edinburgh. At its core is Tait’s abiding interest in natural cycles, which in her films seem to dwarf all human concerns. The final five minutes of the film is a leanly edited sequence of shots from the Orkney coastline, juxtaposition grand sweeps of the seafront to details of shells, driftwood and shale. Read More »

J. Lee Thompson – Tiger Bay (1959)

Wikipedia wrote:
Cardiff Bay played a major part in Cardiff’s development by being the means of exporting coal from the South Wales Valleys to the rest of the world, helping to power the industrial age. The coal mining industry helped fund the building of Cardiff into the Capital city of Wales and helped the Third Marquis of Bute, who owned the docks, become the richest man in the world at the time. Read More »