United Kingdom

Robert J. Flaherty – Industrial Britain (1933)

SPOILER

(from an imdb review)
“Ah, PROPOGANDA! See one of the early propaganda films–worth the viewing
Author: TheMrLee

Grierson set out to make “propaganda,” and this film–with it’s voice-over proclaiming the great value of the British industrial worker, without a hint of ambiguity or doubt–fits that category well. The authoritatarian narrator feels out-of-date and unsophisticated, but the footage is well shot and interesting, and the transparency of the propaganda aspect is almost a reflief at a time when so many films have hidden agendas. ” Read More »

Kevin Brownlow – It Happened Here (1966)

It is the Second World War. The Nazis have invaded Britain. There is a split between the resistance and those who prefer to collaborate with the invaders for a quiet life. The protagonist, a nurse, is caught in the middle.

British film historian Kevin Brownlow was all of 18 when he conceived the idea for this alternate-history film depicting what life in London would have been like if Nazi troops had conquered England in July 1940. Along with his friend and collaborator Andrew Mollo (only 16 at the time), he took eight years to piece the film together using borrowed equipment and begging scraps of film stock from established filmmakers such as Stanley Kubrick. Read More »

Peter Greenaway – 8 ½ Women (1999)

Quote:
ontinuing his pattern of alternating critically praised arthouse projects with alienating personal studies, the controversial Peter Greenaway followed his unexpectedly popular The Pillow Book with 8½ Women, a playful and thoroughly obscure compendium of art history fetishism, film history, and globe-hopping comic debauchery. The results pleased few, but Greenaway fanatics will find it more rewarding than newcomers despite its glaring flaws. Read More »

Noel Langley – Our Girl Friday (1953)

Rich Sadie Patch (delicious miss Joan Collins!) is marooned on a desert island after an emergency on her cruise-ship. With her are Irish stoker Pat, prickly young Jimmy Carrol, and bald and bookish Professor Gibble. All fancy their chances. Read More »

Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones – Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

Synopsis:
History is turned on its comic head when, in tenth century England, King Arthur (Graham Chapman) travels the countryside to find knights who will join him at the Round Table in Camelot. Gathering up the men is a tale in itself but after a bit of a party at Camelot, many decide to leave only to be stopped by God, who sends them on a quest: to find the Holy Grail. After a series of individual adventures, the knights are reunited but must face a wizard named Tim the Enchanter (John Cleese), killer rabbits and lessons in the use of holy hand grenades. Their quest comes to an end however when the Police intervene – just what you would expect in a Monty Python movie. Read More »

Carlos Atanes – Maximum Shame (2010)

Quote:
“Maximum Shame” is an apocalyptic fetish horror musical chess sci-fi weird underground feature movie written and directed by cult filmmaker Carlos Atanes. Read More »

Elizabeth Price – The Woolworths Choir of 1979 (2012)

Elizabeth Price won the 2012 Turner Prize for this piece.

“The Woolworths Choir of 1979 is a three-part video that weaves together distinct bodies of material: photographs of church architecture, internet clips of pop performances and news footage of a deadly fire in a Woolworths furniture store in 1979.” Read More »