United Kingdom

John Baxter – Dreaming (1944)

The British music hall team of Flanagan and Allen tackle the dark jungle, the racetrack and the fog of war…

Reviews
Like most of their films together,the film merely serves as a device for Flanagan & Allen to deliver some of their well heeled stage routines and to provide a number of musical interludes.In this film Flanagan suffers a bump on the head,and whilst being operated on he has a number of totally unrelated dreams. Read More »

John Gilling – The Quiet Woman (1951)

Quote:
Having previously been married to a criminal, Jane Foster (Jane Hylton) takes over a coastal pub named ‘The Quiet Woman’ to start a new life with the help of her loyal and protective employee Elsie (Dora Bryan). She is indignant to discover that the previous owner had allowed an amiable local artist and part-time smuggler Duncan McLeod (Derek Bond) to use the pub for storing contraband goods but despite this, a romantic attachment develops between them. Helen (Dianne Foster), an old flame of McLeods, tricks her way into staying at the pub to pose for him but becomes jealous of Jane and taunts her about knowing her past and threatens to expose her. Pressure then mounts on McLeod when an old Naval colleague Inspector Bromley (John Horsley) arrives at the pub to stay for several weeks. He now is working as a customs officer. And then Jane’s escaped convict husband turns up and demands her help. Read More »

David Lean – This Happy Breed (1944)

Synopsis:
David Lean brings to vivid emotional life Noël Coward’s epic chronicle of a working-class family in the London suburbs over the course of two decades. Robert Newton and Celia Johnson are surpassingly affecting as Frank and Ethel Gibbons, a couple with three children whose modest household is touched by joy and tragedy from the tail end of the First World War to the beginning of the Second. With its mix of politics and melodrama, This Happy Breed is a quintessential British domestic drama, featuring subtly expressive Technicolor cinematography by Ronald Neame and a remarkable supporting cast including John Mills, Stanley Holloway, and Kay Walsh. Read More »

Laurence Olivier – Hamlet (1948)

Olivier’s Hamlet is the Shakespeare film that has received the most prestigious accolades, winning the Academy Awards for Best Picture and Best Actor. However, it was poorly received by Shakespearean purists, who felt that Olivier had made too many alterations and excisions to the four-hour play by cutting nearly two hours worth of content. Read More »

Peter Graham Scott – Children of the Stones (1977)

reviewed by Richard Bowden
(Spoilers Ahead)

Children Of The Stones has been called ‘the children’s Wicker Man’ – one indication of the high regard with which this seven-part 1977 British television series is still held. Resemblances between Robin Hardy’s 1973 cult classic are certainly strong, notably the pervasive strength of the pagan cult which threatens to overwhelm Adam Brake (Gareth Thomas) and his son Matthew (Peter Denim). Other influences include that of Nigel Kneale, whose work had been so prominent in British TV science fantasy. Thomas had already appeared playing a minor part in Kneale’s Quatermass And The Pit (1967). Read More »

John Boorman – The Emerald Forest (1985)

Synopsis by Hal Erickson
The Emerald Forest is based on a true story, as related by Los Angeles Times correspondent Leonard Greenwood. Powers Boothe stars as Bill Markham, a US engineer working on a dam project in the Amazonian jungles. Bill’s young son, Tomme (played by director John Boorman’s son Charley Boorman) is kidnapped in the rain forest by a tribe called “The Invisible People” because of their skills at camouflage – a group that has reportedly never experienced contact with Caucasians. Read More »

Ken Annakin – Very Important Person (1961)

Lively comedy sending up British stiff-upper-lip prisoner-of-war dramas, starring James Robertson Justice as Sir Ernest Pease, a bombastic scientist who ends up in a German PoW camp during World War II. The inmates, led by Jimmy Cooper and Jock Everett, are forced to help him escape. Read More »