USA

Preston Sturges – The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek (1944)

Plot:
One of Paramount’s funniest films of the forties is this Preston Sturges screwball classic staring Betty Hutton (The Greatest Show on Earth) and Eddie Bracken (Hail the Conquering Hero.) Hutton is Trudy Kockenlocker, a small-town gal who feels it is her patriotic duty to dance the night away with soldiers who are headed oversees. Read More »

John Hayes – The Farmer’s Other Daughter (1965)

IMDB wrote:
Farmer Brown wants to sell his daughter, June, to the dastardly Cyrus P. Barksnapper in order to save his farm. But, Jim Huckleberry would like to to do some plowing with June himself. To help, he applies for financial aid, but the government screws up thinking he requested foreign aid. Read More »

Madeline Anderson – I Am Somebody (1970)

Quote:
In 1969, 400 poorly paid black women — hospital workers in Charleston, South Carolina — went on strike to demand union recognition and a wage increase, only to find themselves in a confrontation with the National Guard and the state government.

Supported by such notables as Andrew Young, Charles Abernathy, and Coretta Scott King, the women nonetheless conducted a strike under the guidance of District 1199, the New York based union, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Read More »

Jack Arnold – High School Confidential! (1958)

Quote:
A tough kid comes to a new high school and begins muscling his way into the drug scene. As he moves his way up the ladder, a schoolteacher tries to reform him, his aunt tries to seduce him, and the “weedheads” are eager to use his newly found enterprise, but he has his own agenda. After an altercation involving fast cars, hidden drugs, and police, he’s accepted by the drug kingpin and is off into the big leagues. A typical morality play of the era, filled with a naive view of drugs, nihilistic beat poetry, and some incredible ’50s slang. Read More »

Lew Landers – Man in the Dark AKA The Man Who Lived Twice (1953)

Synopsis:
The refurbished storyline drops the plastic surgery angle but retains the now- disturbing idea that doctors might use brain surgery to “cure” lawbreakers of criminal tendencies. Convicted criminal Steve Rawley (Edmond O’Brien) volunteers for the operation half-assuming that he’ll not survive. He awakes with total amnesia and a more cheerful personality, and under a new name, “Blake” actually looks forward to beginning life afresh tending the hospital’s hedges. Steve is instead kidnapped and beaten bloody by his old cronies in crime Lefty, Arnie and Cookie (Ted de Corsia, Horace McMahon & Nick Dennis), who want to know where Steve hid the loot from their last robbery. Steve remembers nothing, and kisses from his old girlfriend Peg Benedict (Audrey Totter) fail to extract the location of the $130,000. But weird dreams provide clues that might lead Steve and Peg to the money everyone is so desperate to possess. Read More »

Tex Avery – Wild and Woolfy (1945)

“Wild and Woolfy”
M-G-M 8 Mins. Very Funny
In this Technicolor cartoon the wolf, a desperate bandit who rides a contortionist horse, holds up the Good Rumor man for two popsicles, tries to kidnap a beautiful entertainer in a Western saloon, has the sheriff’s posse running ragged in a merry chase, but is always thwarted in his plans by a midget character who rides a midget horse. Read More »

Philip Kaufman – The Wanderers [Preview Cut](1979)

Quote:
At the climax of the spirited teen gangland film, one that unevenly blends together nostalgia and a story of urban angst, Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are A-Changin'” blares out of a Folk City club and signals the beginning of a possibly new enlightened era for the country. The episodic rock’n’roll film passionately directed by Philip Kaufman (“The White Dawn”/”The Right Stuff”/”Quills”) is good at getting at the symbolic changes that took place in its Bronx, Fordham Road, setting, in 1963, and the swagger of teen gangs and their problematic upbringing and aimless street-life existence, but its character depictions, gang rumbles and racial healing scenes are pure Hollywood hokum. Read More »