USA

Henry King – The Sun Also Rises (1957)

ArtsEmerson writes:
Hemingway’s crestfallen tale of American expatriates in Europe is faithfully refashioned for the screen in Henry King’s 1957 drama. The Lost Generation’s carousing lifestyles and misguided behavior are depicted much like in the original text, with performances rich in contradiction and nostalgic sentimentality. Leo Tover’s Cinemascope cinematography, elegantly reserved and yet aptly illustrative, imbues a lively atmosphere into the film’s famous Pamplona bullfighting scene, and the screenplay retains much of the distinct syntax and rhythm of Hemingway’s printed dialogue. Read More »

Fred M. Wilcox – Forbidden Planet (1956)

Quote:
A starship crew goes to investigate the silence of a planet’s colony only to find two survivors and a deadly secret that one of them has. Read More »

Allan Moyle – Times Square (1980)

Two ill-matched teenage girls form a punk band and soon have New York City by its ears. Read More »

Peter Greenaway – The Pillow Book (1996)

kinopoisk.ru

Quote:
As a young girl in Japan, Nagiko’s father paints characters on her face, and her aunt reads to her from “The Pillow Book”, the diary of a 10th-century lady-in-waiting. Nagiko grows up, obsessed with books, papers, and writing on bodies, and her sexual odyssey (and the creation of her own Pillow Book) is a “parfait mélange” of classical Japanese, modern Chinese, and Western film images. Read More »

Buster Keaton – Seven Chances (1925)

Buster Keaton plays a young lawyer who will inherit $7 million at 7 o’clock on his 27th birthday–provided he is married. Long before discovering this, Keaton has pursued a lifelong courtship of Ruth Dwyer, whose refusals have become ritualistic over the years (the passage of time is amusingly conveyed by showing a puppy grow to adulthood). He proposes again, but this time she turns him down because she thinks (mistakenly) that he wants her only so that he can claim his inheritance. The doleful Keaton is thus obliged to spend the few hours left before the 7 PM deadline in search of a bride–any bride. Read More »

D.W. Griffith – True Heart Susie (1919)

True Heart Susie is one of D.W. Griffith’s “pastoral” films, wherein plot takes second
place to characterization and romance. Lillian Gish plays Susie May Trueheart, who
so loves local boy William Jenkins (Robert Harron) that she secretly finances his
education.
As it stands, the film’s dramatic and heart-tugging value has not diminished,
not even after the passage of nearly eighty years. Read More »

David Lynch – Eraserhead (1977)

Quote:
Henry Spencer tries to survive his industrial environment, his angry girlfriend, and the unbearable screams of his newly born mutant child. Read More »