USA

Tex Avery – Porky’s Duck Hunt (1937)

Quote:
New duck hunter Porky is constantly taunted by Daffy, and all the other ducks. The short features what is considered his first official appearance of Daffy Duck. Read More »

    Jennie Livingston – Paris Is Burning (1990)

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    This documentary focuses on drag queens living in New York City and their “house” culture, which provides a sense of community and support for the flamboyant and often socially shunned performers. Groups from each house compete in elaborate balls that take cues from the world of fashion. Also touching on issues of racism and poverty, the film features interviews with a number of renowned drag queens, including Willi Ninja, Pepper LaBeija and Dorian Corey. Read More »

      Edgar G. Ulmer – The Naked Dawn (1955)

      Chicago Film Society writes:
      B-movie master Edgar G. Ulmer work in fantastically garish Technicolor, The Naked Dawn is a tense and whimsical south-of-the-border Western brimming with lust, greed, and hate, just as nasty and intense as Detour. Shot on location in Mexico, The Naked Dawn stars Arthur Kennedy as Santiago the Bandit, who convinces a poor farmer (Eugene Iglesias) to join him on a train robbery. Lured by a life of crime, Iglesias plans to murder Kennedy, while his wife plots to kill him and run away with the Bandit. A favorite of François Truffaut, The Naked Dawn was one of the primary inspirations for Jules et Jim and a flurry of adjectives; the young director called it “poetic and violent, tender and droll, moving and subtle, joyously energetic and wholesome. Read More »

        Kenneth Anger – Eaux d’artifice (1953)

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        A woman dressed elegantly walks purposely through the water gardens at the Villa d’Este in Tivoli, as the music of Vivaldi’s “Winter” movement of “The Four Seasons” plays. Heavy red filters give a blue cast to the light; water plays across stone, and fountains send it into the air. No words are spoken. Baroque statuary and the sensuous flow of water are back lit. Anger calls it “water games.” Read More »

          Tex Avery – Tortoise Beats Hare (1941)

          An upset Bugs challenges the slick Cecil Turtle to a race. Read More »

            Tod Browning – The Unholy Three (1925)

            Lon Chaney — the Man of a Thousand Faces — used his makeup skills, astonishing physicality and profound empathy to create Quasimodo, the Phantom of the Opera and more of the Silent Era’s greatest horror roles. In this hypnotic mix of creepiness and crime, he plays a ventriloquist who dons a granny disguise to team with a strongman and a little person in a bizarre robbery scheme that ends in murder. The film marks an even more fateful alliance than that of the Unholy Three: the collaboration between Chaney and director Tod Browning, who would helm seven more Chaney movies before making Sound Era horror history with Dracula and Freaks. Read More »

              Victor Halperin – Torture Ship (1939)

              A mad scientist performs experiments on “the criminal mind” on captured criminals on board his private ship. Read More »