Video Art

Bill Viola – I Do Not Know What It Is I Am Like (1986)

Quote:
Structured in five parts, Il Corpo Scuro (The Dark Body), The Language of the Birds, The Night of Sense, Stunned by the Drum, and The Living Flame, the tape envisions a metaphysical journey of rational and intuitive thought, from the natural world to spiritual rituals. Viola’s poetic investigation of subject and object, observing and being observed, and his search for knowledge of the self is encapsulated in an indelible visual metaphor: an image of the artist reflected in the pupil of an owl’s eye. Read More »

Mark Leckey – Concrete Vache (2010)

Made for Milton Keynes Gallery’s 10th anniversary using images from its archive and language from its press releases and catalogues.

“This is an attempt to capture the atmosphere of a classic British institution with rudimentary pictures. Its formal qualities coincidentally reference the gridded Master plan of the host city Milton Keynes” Read More »

Elizabeth Price – The Woolworths Choir of 1979 (2012)

Elizabeth Price (b.1966) won the 2012 Turner Prize for this multi-layered video work.

The Woolworths Choir of 1979 2012 is a three-part video that weaves together distinct bodies of material: photographs of church architecture, internet clips of pop performances and news footage of a deadly fire in a Woolworths furniture store in 1979. Read More »

Marcel Broodthaers – A Voyage on the North Sea (1974)

Quote:
Between 1957 and his death in 1976, Marcel Broodthaers made approximately fifty films. The exact number is difficult to determine: Several no longer exist; some are multipart “programs” assembled from groups of short films (many appropriated from industrial or otherwise “authorless” sources); and others are subtle variations on previous works. A recent exhibition at pioneering curator and collector Thomas Solomon’s new gallery, Solo Projects, paired a 16-mm silent film, Un Voyage en Mer du Nord (A Voyage on the North Sea), 1973-74, with a thirty-eight-page, French-bound book that shares its title and ostensible subject matter: the pairing of a late-nineteenth-century amateur painting of an archetypal European ship and a twentieth-century photograph of a pleasure boat against a modern urban backdrop. The roughly four-minute film is projected on a retractable home-movie screen–a Broodthaers motif–and the book displayed on a simple wooden shelf, lit by a single spotlight. Read More »

Nicky Hamlyn – Nicky Hamlyn- Selected Works (1974-2012)

Quote:
Nicky Hamlyn is one of the UK’s key artist filmmakers of the past 30 years, working in 16mm film and video, he has produced a large body of both single screen work and installations in both media. His current practice has two distinct concerns, based on the medium he is using. In much of the film work he has been concerned with developing structures that are derived as closely as possible from the form of the subject matter. In recent years the subjects have been predominantly architectural, but also topographical. He often works frame by frame, in the manner of an animator, and this approach acknowledges the importance of the individual frame as a building block for bigger structures. The aim in establishing a reciprocal relationship between the film frame, the framing edges and the subject’s formal properties, is to eliminate subjective decisions about framing and allow given parameters to have a determining effect. Much of the video work, by contrast, explores the spontaneous interactions between complex events, such as the swirling movements of layers of net curtain, and the video technology used to record process the data it receives. This DVD makes available for the first time his major film and video works from the past 38 years and is accompanied by new essays by Simon Payne and Federico Windhausen. Read More »

Mark Leckey – Dream English Kid 1964-1999 AD (2015)

Dream English Kid is a collage of what Leckey calls ‘found memories’ made from sources such as adverts, TV programmes and music as well as reconstructions using props and models. He made the film after he found a recording on YouTube of a Joy Division concert he attended as a teenager and realised that many of our personal memories can now be found online. While acting as a form of self–portrait for the artist, the film also seeks to connect us all through shared memory and experience. Read More »

Sophie Calle & Greg Shepard – No Sex Last Night aka Double Blind (1992)

http://img535.imageshack.us/img535/3505/vlcsnap7782365.png

For over 20 years Sophie Calle’s work has taken the form of photographic installations and chronicles, whose structure and form reflect a narrative approach – both within themselves individually and, taken together, in terms of Calle’s own career. Born in Paris in 1953, Calle’s early work dates from a world trip in the 1970s that lasted seven years. During a stay in California in 1978 she took her first photographs – graves marked Father and Mother – with no professional intent, she simply had come upon something that ‘her father might like’. On her return to Paris she began tailing unknowns in the street as part of a conscious ‘drifting through the city’, recording the results in notebooks containing photographs and texts. Read More »