Weimar Republic cinema

Carl Boese & Paul Wegener – Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam AKA The Golem: How He Came Into the World (1920)

In 16th-century Prague, a rabbi creates the Golem – a giant creature made of clay. Using sorcery, he brings the creature to life in order to protect the Jews of Prague from persecution. Read More »

    Richard Oswald – Die Blume von Hawaii (1933)

    Suzanne, aspiring artist working in a Parisian night club, is hired by two foreigners to be partnerin for the main singer, on the condition that they must travel to Hawaii. When they arrive, the American governor is aware that the islanders, headed by Prince Lilo Taro, might become rebellious. Read More »

      Robert Wiene – Raskolnikow AKA Crime and Punishment [Italian] (1923)

      Synopsis:
      Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in Saint Petersburg, driven to utter desperation by grinding poverty and near-starvation, formulates a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her money, afterward falling prey to the torment of his own conscience. Read More »

        Leo Birinsky & Paul Leni – Das Wachsfigurenkabinett AKA Waxworks (1924)

        A wax museum hires a writer to give the sculptures stories. The writer imagines himself and the museum owner’s daughter in the stories. Read More »

          Hans Werckmeister – Algol – Tragödie der Macht AKA Tragedy of Power (1920)

          Quote:
          “The rule of coal is gone. The bios plants will provide power to the world from today!” In this rediscovery of Weimar cinema, a dystopian vision of unfettered capitalism that is eerily contemporary, a coal miner makes a Faustian pact with the otherworldly Algol, an alien who teaches him how to harness the energy of his home star and become the most powerful man on earth. Together they become megalomaniacal CEOs of the “Bios-Werke,” lording over the nations of the world by monopolizing renewable energy and by turning workers into slaves. Read More »

            Phil Jutzi – Mutter Krausens Fahrt ins Glück AKA Mother Krause’s Journey to Happiness (1929)

            Quote:
            In the middle of an economic crisis, the workers are living in poverty and struggling to find a little happiness and get a warm meal. Mother Krause lives with her two grown-up children, as well as a shady “bed lodger” and his lover – a prostitute with a child – on just a few square metres. In next to no time, tensions build up, and soon crime is involved too. Mother Krausen’s painstakingly preserved order collapses. This story has lost hardly any of its relevance. In those days, columns of marching workers calling out “Join the ranks!” indicated a possible way out. But the older generation went to the dogs. Read More »

              Joe May – Ihre Majestät die Liebe AKA Her Majesty Love (1931)

              Quote:
              The story is pleasent fluff where Franz Lederer has to marry a rich woman in order to be chief executive of a big firm. He pretends to be in love Käthe von Nagy’s bar girl and just guess how this story could end. Read More »