Yesim Ustaoglu

Yesim Ustaoglu – Iz AKA The Track (1994)

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Kemal is a plainclothes policeman investigating a suicide whose face has been obliterated. He becomes obsessed with the real appearance of the dead man. Read More »

Yesim Ustaoglu – Bulutlari Beklerken AKA Waiting for the Clouds (2003)

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Derek Elley wrote:
A woman in a village by the Black Sea seeks closure on her tangled past in “Waiting for the Clouds,” a timely, potentially resonant idea that makes it to the screen only half-formed. Third feature by Turkish helmer Yesim Ustaoglu, following her acclaimed sophomore outing “Journey to the Sun” (1999), is atmospheric at a visual level but unengaging on an emotional one, largely thanks to a bumpy script. Pic’s original, sensitive theme will attract some festival engagements, but specialized distribution looks to be thin, especially beyond Europe. Read More »

Yesim Ustaoglu – Tereddut AKA Clair Obscur (2016)

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Quote:
Two Turkish women one oppressed by sexist traditions and one liberated by modern mores, have more in common than it would seem. Read More »

Yesim Ustaoglu – Tereddut AKA Clair Obscur (2016)

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Synopsis
“Clair Obscur” is the psychological dance of two women who are deprived of and distanced from their natural right to mature and discover themselves, to love and be loved, and to sustain a real relationship of their choosing. The social cost of these psychological wounds reverberates from micro to macro levels throughout society, rotting it from within. Read More »

Yesim Ustaoglu – Araf (2012)

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Quote:

There isn’t much that can prepare you for the drastic second-half turn of “Araf,” an often-gorgeous drama playing in the Main Slate at the New York Film Festival. Evocative and somewhat alien in equal measure, “Araf” takes place in a withered Turkish countryside that might as well be another planet. We see the economic strife through the lava runoff that occurs in the very first shot of the film, lumbering out of a cauldron, spilling out onto the land. Though fairly mundane within the lives of the characters (one of whom is discussing sex in voiceover as the orange-red substance burns all that lies underneath it), it’s an introduction that rivals the eye-opening early shots of Ridley Scott’s “Prometheus,” though while it was that film’s high point, here it’s an example of a world dying while underdeveloped, neglected, managed and monitored by day laborers barely getting by on their own. Read More »