Alain Cavalier – Un étrange voyage AKA On the Track (1981)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Synopsis
A father-daughter relationship is melded, strained, and deepened by a shared angst: the grandmother in the family left her home by train and never arrived at her destination. The father Pierre (Jean Rochefort) is distraught that the police could basically dismiss the issue as inexplicable, and he decides to retrace on foot the voyage his mother should have made. His daughter Amelie (Camille de Casablanca) goes with him, and the story evolves as the two walk along the train tracks, searching in the nearby terrain and bushes for any evidence that might point to what happened. Along the way, their once antagonistic and distanced relationship (Amelie is a student, her father is a picture-restorer) begins to work itself out… Continue reading Alain Cavalier – Un étrange voyage AKA On the Track (1981)

Pere Portabella – Umbracle (1970)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Pere Portabella (b. 1929, Barcelona) is a veteran Spanish filmmaker whose narrative features—rich in interludes, plot diversions, atmosphere, and unexpected synchronies between sight and sound—limn the avant-garde and expand the expressive potential of cinema. Portabella, who began his cinematic career as a producer of fiction films implicitly critical of General Francisco Franco, had his passport revoked when Luis Buñuel’s Viridiana (1961), which he helped to make, “embarrassed” Spain at the Cannes Film Festival in 1962. When democracy returned to Spain, Portabella served as a senator in the Catalan government. However, throughout his various careers, Portabella continued to make cinema, investigating meaning in the moving image and flexing the notion of genre—particularly for horror films, fantasy films, and thrillers. Continue reading Pere Portabella – Umbracle (1970)

Giles Walker – I Wasn’t Scared (1977)

http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/6783/screenhunter18apr020149.png

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Plot Synopsis from IMDB:

Adolescent Debbie reluctantly looks after her younger brother Todd for the day. Todd wants to go fishing and the two decide to fish in the creek located in a fenced off and restricted WWII bombing test site. The military has the area fenced off since there may still be remnants of dangerous materials there. Todd stumbles across an undetonated bomb, which he believes to be a dud. He takes the propeller off the bomb and plans on taking the bomb with him as a keepsake. Debbie is more concerned about Todd’s find, she believing the bomb could still be active, as it started to smoke after Todd took off the propeller. Debbie is unable to convince Todd to do what she believes is the correct thing to do, which is to tell the police. As Debbie runs off to tell someone in authority of the bomb, Todd goes back to retrieve it. When news of the bomb gets back to the military and their bomb squad, they have to rush back to save Todd from what sounds like a live bomb. Continue reading Giles Walker – I Wasn’t Scared (1977)

W.S. Van Dyke – Eskimo (1933)

Free Image Hosting at www.ImageShack.us

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Plot Synopsis
The remarkable location-filmed Eskimo was adapted from two books: Die Flucht Ins Wiesse Land and Der Eskimo, both written by naturalist Peter Freuchen. Director Woody Van Dyke, in the tradition of his White Shadows on the South Seas and Trader Horn, took his cast and crew on location to the Arctic, arriving by whaling schooner at the topmost settlement in Alaska with author Freuchen as his guide. Van Dyke, Freuchen, and cinematographer Ray Wise also played prominent on-screen roles in the film. Eskimo Ray Mala (billed only by his last name) essays the title role, speaking in the tongue of his ancestors (even though his English was excellent). Rather than use superimposed titles, Van Dyke resorted to old-fashioned silent-movie subtitles in several dialogue sequences. The story concentrates on the more exotic aspects of Eskimo life, notably the race’s (alleged) casual approach to sex. Though tribal leader Mala has, by his own admission, slept with 20 women without benefit of clergy, woe betide anyone who tries to steal his current sweetheart — as a rapacious trader discovers when he’s harpooned to death by the cuckolded hero. Mala is ultimately undone by the Canadian Mounties, whose efforts to civilize the Eskimo community result in a sudden and tragic shift of the balance of power. Editor Conrad A. Nervig won an Oscar for his Herculean efforts to bring cohesiveness to the story. Performing respectably at the box office, Eskimo inspired another location jaunt in 1935: Last of the Pagans, which also starred Ray Mala. by Hal Erickson Continue reading W.S. Van Dyke – Eskimo (1933)

Gyula Nemes – Papagáj AKA Parrot (1999)

http://img856.imageshack.us/img856/678/bscap0092gk2.jpg

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Surrealist short feature about common tricks of uncle Pepin and the young Bohumil Hrabal. The harum-scarum young man pays his looney uncle a visit and his life changes at once. We can find out, where the snowmen lives in summer, what Franz Joe’s favorite food was, how to sell one half of a pair of shoes and fly in a cage. Continue reading Gyula Nemes – Papagáj AKA Parrot (1999)

W.S. Van Dyke – Tarzan the Ape Man (1932)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Tarzan the Ape Man (1932) is the first feature-length talking (sound) version of the Tarzan series. [Tarzan films stretch into the silent film era back to 1918.] The Tarzan saga was based upon the original ‘Lord of the Jungle’ characters created by novelist Edgar Rice Burroughs. The Tar-zan character (called various titles through the years, including John Clayton, Lord Bloomstoke (Greystoke)), first appeared in late 1912 in All-Story Magazine. Many actors have portrayed Tarzan, both on screen and on television, including Elmo Lincoln, Gene Pollar, P. Dempsey Tabler, James Pierce, Frank Merrill, Larry “Buster” Crabbe, Herman Brix (Bruce Bennett), Johnny Weissmuller, Lex Barker, Gordon Scott, Denny Miller, Jock Mahoney, Mike Henry, Ron Ely, Miles O’Keefe, Joe Lara, Wolf Larson, Christopher Lambert, and Casper Van Dien. Continue reading W.S. Van Dyke – Tarzan the Ape Man (1932)

W.S. Van Dyke – Guilty Hands (1931)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Starring: Lionel Barrymore, Madge Evans, Kay Francis, C. Aubrey Smith, Polly Moran, Alan Mowbry

Richard Grant (Barrymore) is a successful lawyer who believes that his many years of dealing with crime has taught him how to commit the perfect murder. He’s working for shady cad Gordon Rich (Mowbry) who informs Grant before a dinner party that he intends to marry his daughter, Barbara (Evans). Grant seethes with anger and, after dinner, kills Rich. It’s almost the perfect crime, but Rich’s troubled mistress Marjorie (Francis), becomes suspicious of Grant. Continue reading W.S. Van Dyke – Guilty Hands (1931)