Nikita Mikhalkov – Neokonchennaya pyesa dlya mekhanicheskogo pianino AKA Unfinished Piece for Mechanical Piano (1977)

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Plot:
Early in the 20th century, family and friends gather at the country estate of a general’s widow, Anna Petrovna. Sofia, the new wife of Anna’s step-son, recognizes Misha, the brother-in-law of one of the widow’s admirers: a few years before, they had been idealistic lovers and now she can’t believe he has settled for a dim wife and a job as a teacher. Amidst parlor games and idle talk of women’s rights and peasants’ capabilities, Sofia and Misha rekindle their love. Will they flaunt convention, abandon families, and run away to pursue lost dreams? Rescue comes from an unexpected place. Read More »

Paddy Considine – Tyrannosaur (2011)

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Joseph (Peter Mullan) is an angry man slowly drinking himself to death in his small English village. With no family to speak of and only his fellow drunks to keep him company, Joseph watches the world through the bottom of his pint glass. But when an unexpected altercation in the village pub leads him to seek shelter in the second-hand shop run by Hannah (Olivia Colman), Joseph finds himself immersed in a domestic drama that will test the limits of his resolve while revealing a side of his humanity he thought no longer existed. Read More »

Antonio Maenza Blasco – Orfeo filmado en el campo de batalla (1969)

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NB: there is no audio track: Maenza’s films were never mastered or fitted with sound. This rip comes from a digitized work print. His films were sometimes screened with live voice performance commenting on and/or enacting what unrolls visually. The text that was read by performers during the few screenings this had at the time it was made can be read HERE (or via googletranslate)

Quote:
In December 1968 I participated in the film Orpheus Shot on the Battlefield, which originated as a collective work, a movie without an author, but which would ultimately be attributed to Antonio Maenza in the end even though he only played the role of the director in the film. The film, which was never provided a soundtrack, was screened on several occasions with a soundtrack performed live consisting of a text for three voices and a number of musical pieces, among which were the “descent into hell” from the opera L’Orfeo by Monteverdi in the version by Edward H. Tarr, released in 1968 by Erato, “New York 1963 – America 1968” from Every One of Us by Eric Burdon and the Animals; and “The Return of the Son of the Monster Magnet” from Freak Out by [Frank Zappa and] The Mothers of Invention. After the “state of emergency” in January 1969, an epilogue was shot but it was never developed. Read More »

Philippe Garrel – Le revelateur (1968)

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This film stands out as a fine example of the Zanzibar movement in France, and as a metaphor for the spirit of repression lived during that era. The film itself was recorded mostly near german concentration camps, and the crew had a lot of problems with the police, nonetheless they managed to shoot a really wonderful film, a continous portrait of escape through dark and gray landscapes much to the reminder of the wonderful text by Gorky, which starts: “Last night I was in the Kingdom of Shadows”.

–fitz Read More »

Stratos Tzitzis – 45m2 (2010)

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Christina is a good looking 23 year-old girl from a working-class family. She works as a sales assistant in a classy hand-bag emporium, and belongs to what the Greeks call “the 700 euros generation” – the young people who work for the minimum wage and live with their parents, because they can’t afford to move out. But Christina has enough of that. She decides to rent a place of her own where she can find herself away from her mother’s watchful gaze. Overstretching herself financially, she moves into a 45m2 flat: the rent’s a bargain because the area’s full of foreigners. A foreigner in their midst, she takes her first steps towards freedom. Read More »

Philip G. Epstein & P. J. Wolfson – The Bride Walks Out [Shooting Script] (1936)

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From the AFI Catalog:

Quote:
The working title of this film was Marry the Girl. MPH’s “In the Cutting Room” adds Sidney Jarvis to the cast, and HR production charts add Eric Blore, Rose Coghlan, Lloyd Ingraham and Jack Adair to the cast. Eric Blore’s participation in the final film is doubtful, while the participation of the others has not been confirmed. RKO borrowed Robert Young from M-G-M for the film. The Bride Walks Out was Edward Small’s first production for RKO. Small was formerly the production head of Reliance Pictures. Read More »

Leigh Jason – The Bride Walks Out (1936)

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A model marries a struggling engineer; but he won’t let her keep her job, and they can’t pay the bills, while she is wooed by a wealthy drinker.

Michael Martin (Gene Raymond) tells Paul Dodson (Ned Sparks) he knows of a better job, and they get fired. Michael asks modeling Carolyn (Barbara Stanwyck) to marry, but she wants to keep her job. After work they go dancing. Michael now earns $35 a week; but Carolyn makes $50. They get married during his lunch hour. Carolyn cries and quarrels with Michael. He hits an officer and is put in jail. In court the drunk Hugh McKenzie (Robert Young) is fined and meets Carolyn. She pleads for Michael, and he gets 30 days or $50. Hugh loans them the money. Michael’s electricity is off. Hugh is paid and reluctantly leaves. Michael carries Carolyn in. Read More »