Search Results for: uploadgig

Niki Caro – Whale Rider (2002)

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Nominated for Oscar. Another 29 wins & 28 nominations.

From IMDb:

“The film presents a glimpse of the Maori society in New Zealand’s North Island. Having visited New Zealand, but not being very familiar with the Maori culture, this film was a refreshing way to learn some aspects of it.

The story presented here has a lot to do with pride and tradition, which is a running theme among different cultural groups the world over. It has to do with the frustration of Koro by the defection of his eldest son, the designated heir of hundred years of a bloodline where only the males can carry the knowledge and the legends from one generation to the next. Continue reading

Otto Preminger – Angel Face (1952)

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Synopsis:
Ambulance driver Frank Jessup (Robert Mitchum) meets the wealthy and beautiful Diane Tremayne (Jean Simmons) while on a call to tend to her stepmother Catherine (Barbara O’Neill), who may have tried to commit suicide. Frank quits his job and stands up his fiancée Mary Wilton (Mona Freeman) to become the Tremayne’s chauffeur — where he can be close to Diane. The longer Frank hangs around, the more he comes to suspect that Diane idolizes her father Charles (Herbert Marshall) and wants to murder her mother. But Frank is too much in love with Diane to do anything about it.

DVD Review Continue reading

François Truffaut – La Nuit Américaine AKA Day for Night (1973)

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Amazon.com review:
François Truffaut’s lavish and fun 1973 comedy-drama about a film production is a clever hall of mirrors, with Truffaut himself playing a director, and his most important actor in real life, Jean-Pierre Léaud (The 400 Blows), portraying Jacqueline Bisset’s immature costar. Day for Night is full of tales undoubtedly told out of school and repeated here in camouflage, and one can’t help but be impressed with the stylistic and technical means by which Truffaut captures the adventurousness of a full-budget shoot. The cast is very good all around, with actors in some cases playing fictional thespians and in other cases playing members of the crew. A sequence set to thrilling music by Georges Delerue celebrates the whole art of filmmaking as seen from an editor’s perspective–it makes one want to drop everything and shoot a film of one’s own. –Tom Keogh Continue reading

Jon Foy – Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of the Toynbee Tiles (2011)

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Quote:
Starting in the eighties, strange tiled messages started appearing on city streets in Philadelphia as well as other major American hubs and even into several South American countries. The message contained on the tiles apparently refers to historian Arnold Toynbee and to Stanley Kubrick’s film “2001: A Space Odyssey.” It seems to reference a metaphysical assertion that some form of resurrection is possible, the exact nature of which is open to interpretation. “Resurrect Dead” follows one man’s obsession about finding out the truth behind the Toynbee Tiles. Justin Duerr, along with two other interested parties, made it a mission to discover the identity of the original tiler. Continue reading

Mark Rappaport – From the Journals of Jean Seberg (1995)

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As in his Rock Hudson’s Home Movies, Mark Rappaport offers a trenchant piece of film criticism, revisionist history, and social commentary in the form of a movie star’s fictionalized autobiography–specifically Jean Seberg (Mary Beth Hurt) speaking from beyond the grave about her life and career, as well as the careers of Jane Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave, who, like Seberg, have also been associated with radical politics. Rappaport is a highly entertaining raconteur as he speaks through his title character, always justifying his many digressions on such subjects as movies about Joan of Arc, close-ups, expressionless actors, film directors who depict their actress-wives as whores, the Vietnam war, the FBI, and the Black Panthers; he also has a rather chilling story to tell–not only about Seberg but also about what her audience did and didn’t see in her films from the 50s, 60s, and 70s, including Saint Joan, Bonjour Tristesse, Breathless, Lilith, and Paint Your Wagon. Essential viewing.

Jonathan Rosenbaum Continue reading